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"wheelchair"

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Doctor Paralyzed from the Waist Down is Still Able to Perform Surgeries



Nov 28, 2013 12:32 PM EST By Camille H

Doctor Paralyzed from the Waist Down is Still Able to Do Surgeries
(Photo: Army Medicine/Flickr) Doctor Paralyzed from the Waist Down is Still Able to Do Surgeries
An orthopedic surgeon who was paralyzed from the waist down still performs surgeries through the use of a stand-up wheelchair, according to the Daily Mail.
Dr. Ted Rummel, an orthopedic surgeon from O'Fallon, Missouri suddenly became paralyzed in 2010 after a blood-filled cyst burst in his spine.
After a year of rehabilitation, he went back to work and started operating on his patients using a traditional wheelchair.
Dr. Rummel told the Enquirer that his freedom has been a lifesaver. "When I'm able to do this, and I can get a piece of my life back, it's huge. It's so special," he said.
Read the full article at Parent Herald 
(http://www.parentherald.com/articles/3092/20131128/doctor-paralyzed-waist-down-still-surgeries.htm)

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Disabled Opportunity: The Entertainment Industry’s Discriminating Against Me

Posted by Ru Porter on 12/02/13 | Filed under Opinion

To become famous, you have to have a uniqueness that separates you from everyone else. But in some cases standing out can be a hindrance – especially if you’re disabled.

The film, music and television industries are already highly competitive and for individuals with physical handicaps achieving a high level of success is even slimmer. Additionally, there aren’t many public figures to represent Americans with disabilities on a mainstream level, which is why networks like NBC would rather hire able-bodied actors such as Blair Underwood to play a paraplegic detective on their latest cop drama, "Ironside". The show, which was part of NBC’s Fall 2013-14 programming, is a reboot of a 1960's drama touting the same name; and chronicles the life of an undercover officer who gets injured and confined to a wheelchair. To some, Ironside’s premise may sound unappealing, but personally I thought the pitch was great – not just because Underwood’s character is disabled, but also because it shed light on a topic that rarely gets any shine.

Read the full article at Refined Hype

(http://www.refinedhype.com/hyped/entry/disabled-chances)

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Is it OK to offer help to someone with a disability?


By Jo Berry
Navigating Sydney University’s hilly campus in my manual wheelchair I was overtaken, even overlooked, on a daily basis.  Despite the fact I would struggle to propel myself along, rarely would a fellow student offer their help. Sometimes I’d even try to look pathetic to secure a push! Whenever I did ask for assistance I was always met with the same refrain: I didn’t want to offend you.
I have been in a wheelchair for years now. After a decade of incorrect diagnoses, I’ve been told I have severe connective tissue dysplasia. It can be really painful, and I’ve had 12 surgeries to mend various joints. Every night when I sleep I dislocate my collarbones and have to put them back in the morning myself. It’s a bit like my bones are held together by rotten elastic bands that have lost their stretch. Even my heart and organs are affected by my condition. These days, I use a motorised wheelchair as my shoulders are no longer strong enough to push a manual chair.
Read the full article at Daily Life
(http://www.dailylife.com.au/life-and-love/real-life/is-it-ok-to-offer-help-to-someone-with-a-disability-20131202-2ylsj.html)

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'Disabled' Mannequins Remind Us That Beautiful Doesn't Mean 'Perfect'


The Huffington Post  |  By 
It's no secret that the smooth, plastic bodies staring out of store windows aren't true physical replicas of the people who stare back at them. But there's no reason they can't be.
Pro Infirmis, an organization for the disabled, created a series of mannequins based on real people with physical disabilities, working with individuals like Jasmine Rechsteiner, a Miss Handicap winner who has spine malformations, and Erwin Aljukić, an actor with brittle bone disease. The project's title? "Because Who Is Perfect? Get Closer."
Read the full article at Huffingtonpost
(http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/12/03/disabled-mannequins-video_n_4379586.html)

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27 Things You’ll Only Know If You’re A Wheelchair User

by 

1. You’ll always be the first to know if someone’s fly is undone.

You'll always be the first to know if someone's fly is undone.
Do us a favour and keep the peep show zipped up.

2. Your dance moves aren’t traditional but they still work.

27 Things You'll Only Know If You're A Wheelchair User
And, damn, they look good.

3. You know each and every crack or pothole on pavements and walkways.

27 Things You'll Only Know If You're A Wheelchair User
Broken pavements, cracks in the path, no slope down from the path to the road… Your hawk-eye view of the ground doesn’t miss a beat.

4. Cobblestones are proof that hell is a place on earth.

Cobblestones are proof that hell is a place on earth.
That goes for the girls in their stilettos too.

5. When a new road or path is laid down, the thrill of bump-free wheeling is overwhelming.

27 Things You'll Only Know If You're A Wheelchair User
It is heavenly.
http://www.buzzfeed.com/louisebruton/things-youll-know-if-youre-a-wheelchair-user

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How Does Society Perceive People In Wheelchairs?

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A long road to recognition for disability campaigner

By Siobhan Heanue

Updated Tue 15 Oct 2013, 8:45pm 
Jacob Baldwin's life-long advocacy for the disabled first came to public attention when he embarked on a four-year-long journey around Australia in his wheelchair.
Mr Baldwin, who was disabled at birth when a motor nerve was severed during a long labour, died from cancer in 2010 at the age of 59.
During his lifetime he said he would like to see a museum celebrating disability set up, and that dream has, at least partly, been realised.
His wheelchair has gone on show at the National Museum of Australia (NMA) in Canberra, alongside other mementos from the trip.
http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-10-15/wheelchair-of-disability-advocate-goes-on-display/5024338

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Building a City with Accessibility for All


I’d like to challenge Harrisburg business owners and residents to consider this quote as it relates to people with disabilities.
When I was just 15 years old, a high school football accident suddenly caused me to need to use a wheelchair for the rest of my life. Certainly unexpected for me, the truth is, having a disability is surprisingly common. Dauphin County is home to more than 32,000 people living with disabilities, and in the United States, approximately one in five people have a disability.
With an aging population and veterans returning from war, this number will rise. Businesses and city residents need to know how to communicate and ensure inclusion of people with disabilities.
Graphic1We can ignite this inclusion by changing how we speak. Categorizing people causes segregation, and the fear of using the wrong terminology is equally debilitating. Using “people first” language is an easy solution. It simply means naming the person first and the disability second. For example, you should say “people with disabilities” instead of “the disabled” or say “a person who uses a wheelchair” instead of “a wheelchair-bound person.”
We also need to encourage city residents to ask questions and be inquisitive, as it drives understanding. Living in a diverse community, we all encounter others who are different from us. Ask questions, learn and clarify with the individual if you are unsure of the appropriate assistance to offer or how to handle a situation.
Read the full article at Today's The Day 
(http://todaysthedayhbg.com/building-a-city-with-accessibility-for-all/)

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'Life doesn’t end when you are dealt a catastrophic blow': A young woman tells us how she's adjusting to life in a wheelchair



In a split second, Suzanne Edwards’s world changed for ever: one moment she was an able-bodied sports fanatic – the next paralysed from the waist down. But she tells Mary Greene she is determined to make the most of life as a ‘20-something on wheels’    

Suzanne Edwards
'Much as I'd like to think there's a cure around the corner, I'm not hanging around doing nothing'

'Have you ever had your whole life change in an instant? A split second that you never saw coming and after which everything changes for ever?’ asks Suzanne Edwards. ‘Well, that’s what happened to me.’ 

On 26 January 2011 at 8pm, on a surf club roof terrace in Morocco, Suzanne, then 23, was looking out to sea, checking the surf, when the balcony railings she was leaning on suddenly gave way. When she toppled, she fell 20 feet, crashed through a roof on the level below and landed hard on a marble floor. (And no, in case that’s what you’re thinking, there was no wild party. And she hadn’t been drinking.)

In that moment she fractured her spine in two places and seriously damaged her spinal cord. Today, paralysed from the waist down, she deftly manoeuvres out of her wheelchair to stretch out more comfortably on the sofa at her sister’s house in North London where we meet. It has been a long day, her first day back in physiotherapy after a recent operation on her back. 

Three times a week, Suzanne drives herself, in her specially adapted car, once for the 180-mile round trip from her own flat in Pulborough, West Sussex, to her rehab gym in Cambridge, then twice to Watford for still more physiotherapy boot camp (130 miles there and back). Being paraplegic is not just about sitting in a wheelchair: it’s unremittingly hard work.

Read the full story at the Daily Mail 

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'We've never had liberté, egalité or fraternité


When limbless French swimming hero Philippe Croizon's wheelchair was stolen, he received a flood of public sympathy. But now he is demanding for the disabled the "liberté, egalité, fraternité" the French Revolution promised over 200 years ago.
'We've never had liberté, egalité or fraternité'
Published: 20 Aug 2013 
By: Dan MacGuill 
Philippe Croizon, a renowned French adventurer who made history in 2010 by becoming the first quadruple-amputee to swim across the English Channel, hit the headlines earlier this month when his custom-designed, €24,000 wheelchair was stolen from him.
The theft caused outrage in France, with politicians, activists and members of the public expressing their disgust at the thieves, before the wheelchair was eventually returned to its rightful owner.
Croizon, however, used the episode as an opportunity to lament that France’s social security system reimbursed him just €3,000 for the crucial equipment, despite the fact that “on average, an electric wheelchair costs about €10,000.”
In the last two weeks, Croizon appears to have received countless letters and messages from other persons with disabilities, sharing their struggle to survive and thrive in France.
On Tuesday, Croizon took to his Facebook page to share an extraordinary and moving open letter to French Prime Minister Jean-Marc Ayrault, demanding the government do more for the country's disabled minority.
Here it is in full, as translated by The Local.
Read the full article at the Local 

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Tech Abled – Empowering Women with Disabilities Through Technology


Many of our Pass-It-On award winners are making Big change in small ways. Casey, one of our Spring Pass-It-On award winner is using her award money to help empower women with disabilities through technology. Read her personal note to our community about her journey and her intent with the PIO award.

My name is Casey and I am 30 years old. Close to 10 years ago, I was involved in a road crash that left me quadriplegic, on a wheelchair and paralyzed from the shoulders down. After rehabilitation and learning to live as a quadriplegic in a developing country, I discovered through several challenges the enormous burden women with disabilities face in the country, not just by being a woman but a disabled woman. I founded the Chariots of Destiny Organization(COD) with the aim to empower especially women living with spinal cord injuries as well as to advocate for road safety. As a result of my injury, I am disabled from the neck down and hence cannot use my hands. I have learnt to use voice-activated software which has also enabled me to run COD strictly by voice.
Through working with COD I have been able to empower women economically, socially and psychologically through different projects. Through the “Adopt a Chair” project, we were able to provide wheelchairs to a number of women with disabilities. Some of these women we found crawling on the ground due to lack of the resources to purchase a wheelchair, while others had been using the same wheelchair for years since they were injured. We started the “Bags of a New Destiny – BAND” project to empower women through education. This project focuses on educating women with spinal cord injuries on everything they need to know with regard to living with a spinal cord injury. The beneficiaries receive bags of information post discharge from hospital. The bags contain journals and reading material on spinal cord injuries as well as DVDs and CDs to train them on different issues including physiotherapy. The beneficiaries also receive samples of healthcare products to start them off on the journey living with a spinal cord injury.
Read more at Anita Borg 

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I spent 20 hours on wheelchair: Guru Syed Sallauddin Pasha



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British athletes seeking advantage from cutting-edge technology

By: Dan Roan 
22 August 2013 

Lutalo Muhammad is feeling ill.
"It's so life-like, I'm getting motion sickness," the European taekwondo champion and Olympic bronze medallist tells me as he tries to complete a flight-simulator challenge usually reserved for the world's best fighter pilots.
Muhammad has been granted access to a secretive bunker at BAE Systems' high-security factory in Warton, Lancashire. Final assembly of Eurofighter Typhoons takes place here and they are also building a multi-billion pound fleet of aircraft for the Royal Saudi Air Force.
It may all seem a far cry from the Korean martial art in which Muhammad excels but, as part of a newly extended partnership between UK Sport and the military defence giant, Warton's aerospace engineers may just hold the key to improving Britain's taekwondo prospects after the team'sdisappointing performance at the recent World Championships in Mexico.
Read the full article at BBC UK

Play m

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Messi draws disabled children to sport

Posted Friday, Aug. 09, 2013

Valentino is a fan of the River Plate soccer club who dreams of dodging down the field like Argentine star Lionel Messi. Adrian wants to score goals like his hero, former Boca Juniors standout Martin Palermo. Eugenia and Sofia just want to have fun with the ball.
All four must use joysticks to get around in motorized wheelchairs, but they're still getting a taste of their dreams. They're among the 50 or so youngsters who recently began playing Powerchair Football in Buenos Aires.
The sport, which began in France in 1978 and now has active leagues in the United States, has finally reached football-mad Argentina, providing an enjoyable outlet for quadriplegics and others who can't walk because of multiple sclerosis, muscular dystrophy, paralysis or spinal cord injuries.
Read more at Star Telegram 

Read more here: http://www.star-telegram.com/2013/08/09/5068969/ap-photos-golazo-disabled-kids.html#storylink=cpy

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Chuck Aoki: Does ‘inspire’ connote heroic or pitiable?



American wheelchair rugby player Chuck Aoki says it’s time for athletes to act upon the IPC’s core value of “inspiration.”
Chuck AokiChuck Aoki © • Getty Images
By Chuck Aoki

“You're so inspiring ... You are amazing, I'm just really inspired by what you do ... I'm just so inspired by you.”
These are words we have all heard as Paralympic athletes, and most people in wheelchairs have as well.
And for most of my life, I have hated being called “inspiring.”
Being inspirational felt like it was something that should be reserved for children, or people in hopeless situations, who fight on regardless. I haven't considered myself to be in either of these categories, at least not since I've been above the age of 15.
As such, I always took offense to being told I was “inspirational” by anyone, because it felt like this inspiration came out of pity toward me. And no one wants to be pitied, least of all Paralympic athletes.
But as I get older, I start to think more about being “inspiring” to people, and I've started to wonder, is it really such a bad thing to be inspiring?
I didn't set out to be inspiring when I began playing wheelchair rugby. My goal was to become the best I could be at it, and I've done fairly well at that.
I've faced a lot of unique challenges to get to this point, but never given up, despite how easily I could have. All Paralympic athletes have. For that matter all people with an impairment who stay active have.
Read more at Paralympic 

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Claim: Airline Forced Man With Special Needs To Crawl


By 
A Hawaii man who relies on a wheelchair says that Delta Air Lines left him no choice but to crawl on and off its airplanes more than once while traveling cross-country, according to a federal lawsuit.
Baraka Kanaan, who is unable to walk as a result of partial paralysis in his legs, claims that he “was forced to crawl across an airport tarmac, up and down the stairs of an airplane, down the aisle of the aircraft and out of and into his seat” on two different occasions while traveling between Hawaii and Massachusetts in July 2012.
In the suit filed last week in U.S. District Court in Hawaii, Kanaan alleges that Delta violated the Air Carrier Access Act, which requires that airlines and airports “provide boarding assistance to individuals with disabilities by using ramps, mechanical lifts or other suitable devices where level-entry boarding by loading bridge or mobile lounge is not available.” The rule applies to any aircraft that can seat 31 or more passengers.
Read more at Disability Scoop 

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Tips for a Traveler with a Disability


  • By: Joni and Friends
  •  
  • Aug. 7, 2013

August is one of the busiest months for travel! It can be challenging navigating airports and train stations, especially when a disability is involved. Careful planning can help reduce stress for any traveler, so here are some simple tips for planning a trip and traveling with a disability:
1. Call ahead of time. In most cases,airlines and other service providers are mandated by law to accommodate travelers with disabilities. By calling ahead of time, you can confirm that your accommodation needs will be met as well as offer the service provider advanced notice so that they can make preparations to welcome you.

2.
 Research your destination. Check out your destination and housing arrangements before you begin your travels. Look for information about wheelchair accessibility, city transportation, hotel disability accommodations, and the accessibility of the sites that you plan to visit. Also, be sure to check with your doctor ahead of time for local health and medical resources around your destination. If you happen to need a doctor during your travels, you’ll be glad that you did the research ahead of time!

3.
 Understand your rights. Familiarize yourself with your rights. Every traveler deserves to be treated with dignity, respect and courtesy. Remember that your rights are legislated for your benefit.

4.
 Be courteous. The security guards and TSA employees have a tough and busy job. Seek to brighten their day during your interaction with them...
Read the full story at Joni and Friends

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A Life Lesson About People With Disabilities For Parents Everywhere



keep-calm-its-only-a-wheelchair
Posted on:  

Since becoming a quadriplegic three years ago, I have quickly learned that people don’t know a whole lot about the disability community. When you’re uneducated about something, I think it’s normal to feel uncomfortable with it. Maybe even afraid of it.
While out in public I often get stares. People will even avoid the isle I’m in at a store and quite often jump out of my way as if I’d run them over. Keep calm. It’s only a wheelchair!
Wheelchair users don’t exactly have the luxury of blending in when they want to. Sometimes I wish I could, but when I’m out and about I personally try and make an effort to smile and wave when I roll by a child. Giving a child a good experience may ultimately make them more understanding and comfortable. The problem is though that some parents don’t know how to react to their child’s curiosity.
Here are few insights about how you can desensitize your child around people with disabilities.
Read more at the Mobility Resource 

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Obesity Is a Major Obstacle for Disabled Americans


Release Date: July 16, 2013 | By Glenda Fauntleroy, HBNS Contributing Writer
Research Source: American Journal of Preventive Medicine



KEY POINTS
  • 41.6 percent of people with a disability that affects mobility are obese, compared to 29.2 of people without a disability.
  • People with disabilities were more likely to have high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes and be prescribed medication for these conditions.


Obesity and its related health problems impacts far more people with a disability than previously reported, according to new research in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.
About 54 million people in the U.S. have a disability that affects mobility. The study looked at how these disabilities affect the prevalence of obesity and chronic conditions such as diabetes and high blood pressure.
Lead author Katherine Froehlich-Grobe, Ph.D., associate professor at University of Texas School of Public Health in Dallas, said the main impetus of the study was to assess the rate of obesity among people with disabilities based on actual measurements rather than people’s self-reported height and weight, which are often inaccurate.
“While we expected to see higher prevalence than earlier estimates based on self-reports, we were surprised to see how high obesity prevalence was among those with a disability,” she said.
For more information go to CFAH

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Student-built wheelchair runs indefinitely on solar power

Student-built wheelchair runs indefinitely on solar

June 6, 2013

 A solar-powered wheelchair designed by students at the University of Virginia has won first prize in a competition, Change My Life in One Minute, to mark World Cerebral Palsy Day. Entrants to the competition were asked to come up with an innovation that could make a significant difference to a person with a disability. The solar-powered wheelchair can run continuously powered only by the sun.

Apparently inspired by the folding roofs of convertible cars, students fitted a wheelchair with a custom-built 1-sq m (11-sq ft) solar panel which the team of students claims allows the wheelchair to travel indefinitely at 1 mph without drawing power from the battery.
At 5 mph, the wheelchair can run for 4.5 hours, which the students say is a range increase of 40 percent. They also point out that the panel brings the added benefit of providing shade to the user. The wheelchair is also fitted with USB ports for the charging of electronic newfangledom.
The team takes away a prize of US$20,000 which the team will use to perfect the chair, before shipping to Alper Sirvan in Turkey, who came up with the suggestion for the project. Any remaining prize money will be returned to United Cerebral Palsy.
In November 2010, inventor Haidar Taleb set out to cross the United Arab Emirates in a solar-powered wheelchair over the course of 11 days.
There's more technical info on the University of Virginia's wheelchair in the video below.
Read more at Gizmag

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