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"physically disabled"

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What can the disabled workforce bring to your company?



Can a proper understanding of "sustainability" still be limited to environmental issues or the so-called "green economy"? Increasingly, many would argue not.

Sustainability now incorporates social dimensions such as social inclusion, equal opportunities and anti-discrimination. They are fundamentally linked, and future sustainability efforts must consider them.
Despite the difficult economic climate, it's good to know the Europe 2020 future growth strategy, developed by EU membersa, reflects this perspective.
EU2020 is focused on "smart, sustainable and inclusive growth", that is interlinked. Furthermore, the European Commission recently launched a new, three-year strategy for CSR which stresses that, to fully meet their objectives in this area, enterprises should integrate social, environmental, ethical, human rights and consumer concerns into their business operations.
Read more at the Guardian 
(http://www.theguardian.com/sustainable-business/disabled-workers-european-disability-strategy)

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A new golden age for cane design?

SARA HENDREN on ABLER Monday 11:22am

Auction houses will still sell you exquisite canes from the late 19th and early 20th century. They often feature ornate carved wood or engraved silver, with all manner of designs and images on their handles. For those who aren't antiques enthusiasts, however, canes have been bereft of much contemporary design imagination. Until recently, that is. An Indie-gogo funded design team, Top and Derby, have created their new "sneaker-styled" Chatfield walking cane:
A new golden age for cane design?SEXPAND
It comes in four sizes to ideally match multiple heights.
Read more at Abler. Gizmodo
(http://abler.gizmodo.com/a-new-golden-age-for-cane-design-1474883656)

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10 Things The Media Should Stop Doing When Discussing Disabilities

Posted on:  

The media loves to think they know everything. They love being in on the latest “it” thing, acting like they’re hip and can relate to the people. However, they never seem to care about stepping it up when it comes to referring to people with disabilities in the most appropriate way.
The written and spoken word is constantly evolving too. The media knows when to use “twerk” and “tweet,” but would it kill them to stop saying “wheelchair-bound?”
If the way the media discusses disabilities makes you cringe, read on for the top ten things the media should stop doing when discussing disabilities.
1) Stop saying “wheelchair-bound.”
A term nearly as old as the wheelchair itself, the term “wheelchair-bound” needs to be left in the antique store with its wooden wheelchair-counterpart. Seriously, who says this anymore? Saying “Tiffiny is wheelchair-bound” is absolutely the wrong way to refer to someone who uses a wheelchair, yet the media does it all the time.
We are not bound by our wheelchairs. How can we be “bound” by something that makes us so independent? If anything, it should be more like “the chair is human-bounded” rather than the “person is wheelchair-bound.” We overtake the wheelchair and make it our own. I even think some of us would even put nano-technology into our bodies if it was possible. What should they say instead? Look for the answer below.
Read the full article at the Mobility Resource 
(http://www.themobilityresource.com/10-things-mainstream-media-should-stop-doing-when-discussing-disabilities/)

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Is it OK to offer help to someone with a disability?


By Jo Berry
Navigating Sydney University’s hilly campus in my manual wheelchair I was overtaken, even overlooked, on a daily basis.  Despite the fact I would struggle to propel myself along, rarely would a fellow student offer their help. Sometimes I’d even try to look pathetic to secure a push! Whenever I did ask for assistance I was always met with the same refrain: I didn’t want to offend you.
I have been in a wheelchair for years now. After a decade of incorrect diagnoses, I’ve been told I have severe connective tissue dysplasia. It can be really painful, and I’ve had 12 surgeries to mend various joints. Every night when I sleep I dislocate my collarbones and have to put them back in the morning myself. It’s a bit like my bones are held together by rotten elastic bands that have lost their stretch. Even my heart and organs are affected by my condition. These days, I use a motorised wheelchair as my shoulders are no longer strong enough to push a manual chair.
Read the full article at Daily Life
(http://www.dailylife.com.au/life-and-love/real-life/is-it-ok-to-offer-help-to-someone-with-a-disability-20131202-2ylsj.html)

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‘Woof to Wash’ laundry machine lets dogs help people with disabilities

By Nadine Kalinauskas | Good News – Tue, 26 Nov, 2013
A man from Leeds has invented a dog-controlled washing machine.
The "Woof to Wash" machine has a bark-activated "on" switch. A special "paw" button allows the pooch to easily open and close the machine's door.
The inventor, John Middleton of U.K. laundry company JTM, intends for the "Woof to Wash" machine to make laundry an easier task for people living with disabilities by letting them delegate the trickier parts of the job to support dogs who have been trained to load and empty the machines.

Read the whole article at Yahoo News 
(http://ca.news.yahoo.com/blogs/good-news/woof-wash-laundry-machine-lets-dogs-help-people-173054560.html)

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Photographing a full life, with a disability

In 1988, Patricia Lay-Dorsey experienced her first unexplained fall. Eight months later, the then-45-year-old marathoner was diagnosed with chronic progressive multiple sclerosis.

Since that initial diagnosis, Lay-Dorsey, an artist, photographer and retired social worker, has used art and poetry to process her feelings about her condition. In 2006, she became serious about photography and for the past five and a half years, has worked on an intensive self-portrait project documenting her experience living with MS.

Fifty of those images have been compiled into a book, "Falling into Place," published byFfotogallery this month. Lay-Dorsey plans to distribute the book to universities, doctor's offices, non-profits and other outlets in the hope that the images will educate viewers about the reality of life with a disability, as well as inspire those living with their own challenges. 


Read the full article at CBS News

(http://www.cbsnews.com/pictures/photographing-a-full-life-with-a-disability/)

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'Disabled' Mannequins Remind Us That Beautiful Doesn't Mean 'Perfect'


The Huffington Post  |  By 
It's no secret that the smooth, plastic bodies staring out of store windows aren't true physical replicas of the people who stare back at them. But there's no reason they can't be.
Pro Infirmis, an organization for the disabled, created a series of mannequins based on real people with physical disabilities, working with individuals like Jasmine Rechsteiner, a Miss Handicap winner who has spine malformations, and Erwin Aljukić, an actor with brittle bone disease. The project's title? "Because Who Is Perfect? Get Closer."
Read the full article at Huffingtonpost
(http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/12/03/disabled-mannequins-video_n_4379586.html)

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21 Awesome Things Living Life With Disabilities Can Do For You

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It's no secret that there's a collective perception in our society that being disabled is a bad thing. In a fair amount of people's minds, physical death would be a better alternative than having a disability would. Why? Because in their minds, facing the consequences of physical death would be much easier than facing the consequences of having a disability.
Who could blame anyone for thinking this way. Living life with disabilities can indeed be a very scary bitch!
Even though things have slowly improved for our segment of the population over the years, the world is still not completely designed with us or our needs in mind. Because of that, everything is harder for us. From living day to day, to taking care of ourselves, to "walking" around our neighborhood, to going to school, to getting a job to riding a bus or driving a car, to living on our own to having any kind of relationship whatsoever. Everything is harder if you have disabilities.
And then, there are the feelings that come along with living the disability life. Physical pain, frustration, anger, social prejudice, alienation, un-equality, un-acceptance and loneliness can be very hard to face. But, if one can conquer and move past these, 21 awesome things can happen. Read more about them below...
http://jparrottmerrell.hubpages.com/hub/benefits-of-living-life-with-a-disability

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#heardwhilstdisabled: Things said to disabled people

By Damon Rose

The #heardwhilstdisabled hashtag is doing good business on Twitter. Parodying "overheard in the office" columns, disabled social media users are contributing uncomfortable glimpses into their lives by sharing the things the public can say.
The subsequent tweets are full of fascinating misunderstandings and bigger examples of being patronised, which can sometimes materially affect lives and the way disabled people want to live.
Here's a selection:
  • "I'd give anything to be sick like you and be thin"
  • "You're smiling - you can't be in that much pain"
  • "If she was my kid, I'd have her walking by now"
  • "So, is your daughter normal then?"
  • "Isn't it lovely to see them out and about?"
  • "People don't want to see people with disabilities on stage - they've come out to have a nice time"
  • "People like you should be in homes, it's not fair that the rest of us have to deal with your problems"
Baroness Tanni Grey-Thompson is not immune either. She tweeted: "[D]id you really think about getting pregnant because people like you will find it hard."
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/blogs-ouch-24064300

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UN Holds First Major Meeting On Helping People With Disabilities...And It's About Time

By EDITH M. LEDERER 09/23/13

UNITED NATIONS — Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon opened a historic U.N. meeting of world leaders Monday "to break barriers and open doors" for the more than 1 billion disabled people around the world.
The goal of the first-ever high-level General Assembly meeting was to spur international action to ensure that the disabled can contribute to the global economy.
"Far too many people with disabilities live in poverty (and) too many suffer from social exclusion" and are denied access to education, health care and social and legal support, Ban said.
Monday's meeting is the prelude to the annual U.N. gathering of presidents, prime ministers and monarchs, which starts Tuesday...
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/09/23/un-meeting-disabilties_n_3975237.html?utm_hp_ref=tw

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5 People Whose Major Disabilities Only Made Them Stronger


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Everyone loves stories about people who achieved fantastic things despite their disabilities; they make us feel better about the human race and, by extension, ourselves. Well, these stories aren't like that. These are about people who not only overcame their horrific disabilities, but did so in such balls-shatteringly unbelievable ways that they make the rest of us look like shit in the process. Prepare to feel completely worthless when compared to the awesomeness of ...

View list via Cracked 

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On Life Without a Jaw



Ray827: "What questions do you always get?" 
ScribbleScribe: "From kids: Why can't she talk? [While pointing at me.] Then their parents try to explain that I can talk, but with my hands."

"From adults: Silence."
ScribbleScribe is a 24-year-old predoctoral psychology student who fielded questions yesterday, based on her life with congenital aplasia of the mandible and hearing loss. She did soanonymously on Reddit.

Her lower jaw, tongue, and the bones of her inner ear did not fully form in utero. She breathes through a tracheostomy (tube in her neck), and has since birth. She is able to hear, with aids, but she still has to get all of her nutrition through a feeding tube. She's never eaten solid food.

She drew a massive, curious, and generally effusively compassionate audience yesterday. Her writing is earnest and insightful. For example, she talks about keenly watching the progress of 3-D printing, as a potential for one day creating a mandible. And why she doesn't use assistive speech technology.
I rejected the assistive speech devices I was offered in elementary. I hated them. Why? Because the voice sounds so much different than the normal human voice. It cannot get pronunciation right. It cannot express emotion. Technology isn't advanced enough to give me the voice that I need/want. Imagine having a voice that couldn't express your intonation, your emotion, your beat ... rhythm ...
It was just monotone. Sound fun? It wasn't for me. Science needs to give me an EKG headset to monitor my brain waves and incorporate it into any assistive speech device. It would understand my intonation and my nuances of expression better than just pictures on a box.
Sign language offers me my mode of communication.

Read the full article at the Atlantic 

(http://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2013/08/on-life-without-a-jaw/278794/)

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Ouch talk show 100: Sex and relationships special


How does a young man lose his virginity when his arms and legs don't work? What's it like to be both gay and disabled? And is falling in love with your care worker ever a good thing?
Disabled panellists Asta Philpot, Daryl Beeton and Kirsty Liddiard talk sex and relationships with presenters Rob Crossan and Kate Monaghan.
Warning: This programme contains adult themes and some may find it an uncomfortable listen.
But the tone is friendly and informal. Parents of disabled teenagers might appreciate listening to this with their child as a helpful discussion-opener.

Here are some useful links so you can find out more about the people and subjects on talk show 100.
  • Asta Philpot, 32, is from Leeds. He can't use his arms or legs due to arthrogryposis and campaigns for access to sex for people in a similar boat via his personal website. In the 2007 BBC documentary, One Night Only, Asta took two disabled men to a specialist brothel in Spain where he had lost his virginity a year earlier (see Is it OK for disabled people to go to brothels? from the Magazine).
  • Kirsty Liddiard spoke to 25 disabled people about their sex lives for her PhD. She continues to specialise in this field at Rierson University in Toronto, teaching on the BA in disability studies course and she's on the board of directors at the Rose Centre for young adults with disabilities which, amongst other things, helps its clients with matters relating to sex.
  • Daryl Beeton runs Kazzum, a theatre company for young people. He is gay and has a mobility impairment. You may remember him as a contestant on BBC Two's Beyond Boundaries programme.
  • Regard is an organisation which supports people in the UK who are gay and disabled.
  • Fringe disability organisation Outsiders are concerned with "sexual freedom" and expression. They run an annual Sex Maniacs Ball - which isn't quite what the name suggests it might be.
A high quality version is on Audioboo
Read more at BBC News

(http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/blogs-ouch-24030101)

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British athletes seeking advantage from cutting-edge technology

By: Dan Roan 
22 August 2013 

Lutalo Muhammad is feeling ill.
"It's so life-like, I'm getting motion sickness," the European taekwondo champion and Olympic bronze medallist tells me as he tries to complete a flight-simulator challenge usually reserved for the world's best fighter pilots.
Muhammad has been granted access to a secretive bunker at BAE Systems' high-security factory in Warton, Lancashire. Final assembly of Eurofighter Typhoons takes place here and they are also building a multi-billion pound fleet of aircraft for the Royal Saudi Air Force.
It may all seem a far cry from the Korean martial art in which Muhammad excels but, as part of a newly extended partnership between UK Sport and the military defence giant, Warton's aerospace engineers may just hold the key to improving Britain's taekwondo prospects after the team'sdisappointing performance at the recent World Championships in Mexico.
Read the full article at BBC UK

Play m

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Dr. Kevin Bethel clears up misconceptions about stem cells

By Yasmin Popescu - Media Unlimited
Aug 14, 2013 - 11:31:07 PM

DSCN6463sm.jpg
Freeport, Grand Bahama - The Bahamas may have missed the boat on being the first country with a stem cell research center. One was proposed for Grand Bahama but due to lack of proper legislation has delayed.


Dr. Kevin Bethel of Freeport Family Wellness Center, made this statement as he addressed the Rotary Club of Grand Bahama Sunrise on Wednesday morning at Geneva’s Restaurant.
He stated that at the outset that there has been some misconceptions about stem cells which he said for the most part was unfounded.

“Because,” he continued, “we have to start with the definition – what is stem cell? We are not talking about something that is produced from outer space or high science fiction thing or anything they have been talking about. All of us have stem cells in our body.

“Stem cells are biologically active cells in the body that have the ability to transform into any cell line in the body. So there are any types of stem cells. The basic definition of stem cell is a cell that has the ability to turn itself into any type of cell.”

Dr. Bethel said that whenever someone has an injury, stem cells can be taken from the person to regrow and provide self-population for the repair.

“So for something as simple as a cut or burn on the skin, we have stem cells in our skin, and in the fat layers under our skin, that can transform into the various different types of cells that are necessary for our skin to grow back. It’s a miracle when you see things like that.”

While admitting that at first the stem cell research began using placentas, Dr. Bethel said that at this present time, stem cells are taken from the person who needs it and grown.



Read more at the Bahamas Weekly

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Disability Facts as of 2013


Population Distribution

56.7 million

image of People With Disabilities
Number of people with a disability living in the United States in 2010. They represented 19 percent of the civilian noninstitutionalized population. Disabilities include, for instance, having difficulty seeing, hearing, having speech understood, walking, bathing, dressing, eating, preparing meals, going outside the home, or doing housework, having Alzheimer's, dementia, autism, cerebral palsy, or dyslexia, and being frequently depressed or anxious.
By age —
  • 8 percent of children under 15 had disabilities.
  • 21 percent of people 15 and older had disabilities.
  • 17 percent of people 21 to 64 had disabilities.
  • 50 percent of adults 65 and older had disabilities.
Source: Americans with Disabilities: 2010 <www.census.gov/prod/2012pubs/p70-131.pdf>

20%

Percentage of females with a disability, compared with 17 percent of males.
Source: Americans with Disabilities: 2010 <www.census.gov/prod/2012pubs/p70-131.pdf>

Where They Live

19%

Percent of the civilian noninstitutionalized population in West Virginia with a disability ─ the highest rate of any state in the nation. Utah, at 9 percent, had the lowest rate.
Source: 2011 American Community Survey, Table R1810 <http://factfinder2.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/11_1YR/R1810.US01PRF>

Specific Disabilities

7.6 million

image of How Common are Specific Disabilities
Number of people 15 and older who had a hearing difficulty. Among people 65 and older, 4 million had difficulty hearing.
Source: Americans with Disabilities: 2010 <www.census.gov/prod/2012pubs/p70-131.pdf>

8.1 million

Number of people 15 and older with a vision difficulty.
Source: Americans with Disabilities: 2010 <www.census.gov/prod/2012pubs/p70-131.pdf>

30.6 million

Number of people 15 and older who had difficulty walking or climbing stairs.
Source: Americans with Disabilities: 2010 <www.census.gov/prod/2012pubs/p70-131.pdf>

3.6 million

Number of people 15 and older who used a wheelchair to assist with mobility. This compares with 11.6 million people who used a cane, crutches or walker.
Source: Americans with Disabilities: 2010 <www.census.gov/prod/2012pubs/p70-131.pdf>

2.4 million

Number of people 15 and older who had Alzheimer's disease, senility or dementia.
Source: Americans with Disabilities: 2010
<www.census.gov/prod/2012pubs/p70-131.pdf>

12.0 million

Number of people 15 and older who required the assistance of others in order to perform one or more activities of daily living or instrumental activities of daily living, such as bathing, dressing, doing housework, and preparing meals.
Source: Americans with Disabilities: 2010 <www.census.gov/prod/2012pubs/p70-131.pdf>
Read the full article at Census

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Coping with the News that Your Child has Special Needs


Receiving the News

I remember very clearly the day our pediatrician told me and my husband about our daughter's disability. She had been born eleven weeks premature, and we knew she had suffered some brain damage during the emergency c-section, but despite those facts, we still hoped for the best. At six months old, we knew she was behind developmentally, but we thought it was because of her prematurity. At the doctor's office, however, we found out differently. He told us it looked like she had symptoms of cerebral palsy and that the best thing for her would be to get involved in occupational and physical therapy right away. My husband sat there, stunned. I held my sleeping daughter in my arms with one question racing through my mind. I had to ask, "Does this mean she could be in a wheelchair the rest of her life?"
When he answered, I began to cry and the doctor came over and hugged me and my daughter.
That was nearly five years ago. I did not cope very well with the news. I felt a myriad of emotions - sadness, guilt, overwhelmed, anxious, scared - all of which led me into a state of depression. If I had known then what I know now, I probably would have had an easier time dealing with this news. That's why I'd like to share.

Acceptance

Acceptance of your child's special needs can be very difficult. Every parent wants their child to be healthy and whole. "As long as my baby's healthy" is often what parents say when asked if they want a boy or a girl. When it turns out the baby is not healthy, it can be very traumatic.
The most helpful thing to accept what is going on with your son or daughter is to grieve what your child may never be. One of the things I had to grieve was that I might never be able to see my daughter take her first steps. A parent of an autistic child may have to grieve the loss of their child ever having an in-depth conversation. Depending on the child's disability, the grieving will be different for each case.
During the grieving process, remember that is okay to cry and to feel sad. It's important to feel these feelings instead of trying to stuff them down deep inside, which could ultimately lead to depression, as it did with me. The important thing is to not stay stuck in these emotions.

Read the full article at Carl Jean 

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71% of Americans Believe That by 2050, Artificial Limbs Will Perform Better Than Natural Ones





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Fascinating new data from the Pew Research Center
AUG 6 2013
In a report out today, the Pew Research Center offers a fascinating look at Americans' views on aging -- and on, specifically, the practice known as "radical life extension." The majority of American adults, the survey found, don't believe that such life extension capabilities will be generally feasible in the near future: 73 percent of them, asked whether the average person would live to be 120 years old by the year 2050, answered in the negative.

Where Americans place more confidence, it seems, is in the incremental technologies that could contribute to longer life spans. As part of its survey, Pew asked its respondents how optimistic they are about things like artificial limbs and cures for cancer. And the responses they got were fascinating:

Read more at the Atlantic 

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Alongside Monet, Amazon Features Artists With Special Needs


By 


As Amazon.com enters the world of fine art this week, the Internet retail giant is putting a spotlight on artists with developmental disabilities.
Los Angeles-based DAC Gallery — which represents some 140 artists with developmental disabilities — is one of about 150 art galleries and dealers being included in the launch of Amazon Art, a new section of the retail website that features fine art from some of the nation’s top galleries.
DAC Gallery is part of the nonprofit Exceptional Children’s Foundation, which offers a handful of art studios where individuals with developmental disabilities hone their craft. Artists in the program have previously shown their work at the Smithsonian Institution and the Kennedy Center in Washington D.C., among other venues, officials with the nonprofit said.
Read more at Disability Scoop

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‘Disability is my blessing’

‘Disability is my blessing’


By Camille Bethel camille.bethel@trinidadexpress.com 

The Ministry of the People and Social Development yesterday launched its first Health and Wellness Fair, with a five-kilometre walk/run around the Queen’s Park Savannah, Port of Spain, with “global social motivator”, triple amputee Ra­jesh Durbal in the run.

Durbal, whose parents were born in Trinidad, lives in Florida, USA, and has competed in several Iron Man endurance challenge events.

He was described by Minister of the People Dr Glenn Ramadharsingh as “an icon of strength, conviction, determination and a symbol that impossible is nothing”.

Speaking with the Express before the 5K, the 35-year-old Durbal—a congenital amputee who was born with his legs and right arm not fully developed—said it had not stopped him from accomplishing his goals. 

“It has actually been a blessing in my life because it has made me the man that I am. Through adversity, we grow, and with me not having all my limbs, it has forced me to grow in areas that normally, a person would not want to grow and because of that, it has made me very unique.

I am the only triple amputee doing triathlons and competing at such a high level, so it actually differentiates me from everybody else. So it has been a blessing in that sense. Everything you have in life is a gift, whe­ther it be your limbs or your brains, and you should be using all of your gifts,” he said.
Durbal said last year, he was a part of the ministry’s “No excuses” campaign which toured schools around the country, and he came back this year and did a tour.

There, he met Ramadharsingh, who invited him to come back. 


Read the story at Trinidad Express

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