Viewing entries in
"invisible disability"

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21 Awesome Things Living Life With Disabilities Can Do For You

by 

It's no secret that there's a collective perception in our society that being disabled is a bad thing. In a fair amount of people's minds, physical death would be a better alternative than having a disability would. Why? Because in their minds, facing the consequences of physical death would be much easier than facing the consequences of having a disability.
Who could blame anyone for thinking this way. Living life with disabilities can indeed be a very scary bitch!
Even though things have slowly improved for our segment of the population over the years, the world is still not completely designed with us or our needs in mind. Because of that, everything is harder for us. From living day to day, to taking care of ourselves, to "walking" around our neighborhood, to going to school, to getting a job to riding a bus or driving a car, to living on our own to having any kind of relationship whatsoever. Everything is harder if you have disabilities.
And then, there are the feelings that come along with living the disability life. Physical pain, frustration, anger, social prejudice, alienation, un-equality, un-acceptance and loneliness can be very hard to face. But, if one can conquer and move past these, 21 awesome things can happen. Read more about them below...
http://jparrottmerrell.hubpages.com/hub/benefits-of-living-life-with-a-disability

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#heardwhilstdisabled: Things said to disabled people

By Damon Rose

The #heardwhilstdisabled hashtag is doing good business on Twitter. Parodying "overheard in the office" columns, disabled social media users are contributing uncomfortable glimpses into their lives by sharing the things the public can say.
The subsequent tweets are full of fascinating misunderstandings and bigger examples of being patronised, which can sometimes materially affect lives and the way disabled people want to live.
Here's a selection:
  • "I'd give anything to be sick like you and be thin"
  • "You're smiling - you can't be in that much pain"
  • "If she was my kid, I'd have her walking by now"
  • "So, is your daughter normal then?"
  • "Isn't it lovely to see them out and about?"
  • "People don't want to see people with disabilities on stage - they've come out to have a nice time"
  • "People like you should be in homes, it's not fair that the rest of us have to deal with your problems"
Baroness Tanni Grey-Thompson is not immune either. She tweeted: "[D]id you really think about getting pregnant because people like you will find it hard."
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/blogs-ouch-24064300

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UN Holds First Major Meeting On Helping People With Disabilities...And It's About Time

By EDITH M. LEDERER 09/23/13

UNITED NATIONS — Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon opened a historic U.N. meeting of world leaders Monday "to break barriers and open doors" for the more than 1 billion disabled people around the world.
The goal of the first-ever high-level General Assembly meeting was to spur international action to ensure that the disabled can contribute to the global economy.
"Far too many people with disabilities live in poverty (and) too many suffer from social exclusion" and are denied access to education, health care and social and legal support, Ban said.
Monday's meeting is the prelude to the annual U.N. gathering of presidents, prime ministers and monarchs, which starts Tuesday...
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/09/23/un-meeting-disabilties_n_3975237.html?utm_hp_ref=tw

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Living with Pain: An Invisible Disability


 
Disability-Isolation1
Last February, on the night before moving into our new apartment in Chicago, I slipped on a patch of ice. I landed on my back, in the same location where 14 years earlier I had spinal surgery that left me with 6 bolts holding my spine together. Later, I had a spinal cord stimulator implanted near the same spot.
The force of my fall jammed the stimulator into the surrounding tissue, where it became inflamed and embedded, causing me the worst, most sustained and most stressful pain of my life.
Six weeks after my fall I was bent over in the lobby of our building, waiting for the elevator with my service/support dog, Dylan, a 29-pound rescue dog who took well to training. I was bent over, leaning against the wall to reduce the pain, when a tall man entered the hallway and stood staring at me with malice. I thought nothing of it.
Within moments an elevator car opened directly opposite Dylan and me. As I slowly raised my torso the stern man bolted across the hall to get to the doorway before me.
As I tried to enter on the left side of the opening, he stepped in front of me with his arms stretched wide and growled, “Take the service elevator.”
Read the full story at National Pain Report 

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