Viewing entries in
"entertainment"

Comment

Timothy Archibald talks Photography and Autism Awareness


Timothy Archibald has received acclaim in the news for taking photos of his son Eli who has autism. The “ECHOLILIA Series” as Timothy calls it was started when his son was 5 and lasted untill he was 8. You can see more photos from his series here.

Can you tell us more on how the Echolilia Series started and what you hoped to gain from it?
Well, like most things, it just began as a reaction. My son was five, had just started Kindergarten, and suddenly every moment and every topic in the house revolved around Eli. The school wants to know why is he acting a certain way? The parents have questions about Eli…Eli this, Eli that….everyone was suddenly trying to address this unusual behavior or simply this bit of unusual something that inhabited Eli. My wife and I didn’t really know anything was up…we just knew he always was a challenge. But after our second son grew older and we started to see what a non autistic child was like…we started to get an idea that things were different with Eli. In an attempt to gain some control over this situation, I begain photographing him during times we were together and alone. 
Like most kids, you can’t really make Eli do something if he doesn’t want to. So he wasn’t very interested in being in the photo alone. But if he could collaborate, if he could suggest the pose, the idea the structure, then he was very much into it. That began our process.
Read the full article at Autism Speaks 
(http://www.autismspeaks.org/news/news-item/timothy-archibald-talks-photography-and-autism-awareness)

Comment

Comment

Disabled Opportunity: The Entertainment Industry’s Discriminating Against Me

Posted by Ru Porter on 12/02/13 | Filed under Opinion

To become famous, you have to have a uniqueness that separates you from everyone else. But in some cases standing out can be a hindrance – especially if you’re disabled.

The film, music and television industries are already highly competitive and for individuals with physical handicaps achieving a high level of success is even slimmer. Additionally, there aren’t many public figures to represent Americans with disabilities on a mainstream level, which is why networks like NBC would rather hire able-bodied actors such as Blair Underwood to play a paraplegic detective on their latest cop drama, "Ironside". The show, which was part of NBC’s Fall 2013-14 programming, is a reboot of a 1960's drama touting the same name; and chronicles the life of an undercover officer who gets injured and confined to a wheelchair. To some, Ironside’s premise may sound unappealing, but personally I thought the pitch was great – not just because Underwood’s character is disabled, but also because it shed light on a topic that rarely gets any shine.

Read the full article at Refined Hype

(http://www.refinedhype.com/hyped/entry/disabled-chances)

Comment

Comment

Brilliant photography of the faces of autism – Evidence and Artifacts: Facing Autism


We are honored to feature a new show on the network hosted by the incredible Dr Gil Gippy, co author of Respecting Autism with the late Stanley Greenspan. For his premiere he is bringing us a very special guest, Christopher Gauthier, a brilliant photographer and autism advocate who has photographed some of the most renowned experts in the autism community as well as the beautiful children they give a voice. The premiere of Respecting Autism will air Sunday December 8th at 9pmE/6pmP
Evidence and Artifacts: Facing Autism, the brilliant photography of Christopher M. Gauthiér’s in collaboration with his wife Jacqueline, Autism parents and advocates. Click on any picture to enter the gallery.
Evidence and Artifacts: Facing Autism is a long-term photographic project documenting the growing number of individuals, families and invested teachers, advocates, clinicians, medical professionals and researchers on the front lines fighting back against disability. Facing Autism is both a call to action, and a way to honor those who are rising to the challenge autism presents everyday.
Read more at the Coffee Klatch 
(http://thecoffeeklatch.com/brilliant-photography-of-the-faces-of-autism-evidence-and-artifacts-facing-autism/)

Comment

Comment

Photographing a full life, with a disability

In 1988, Patricia Lay-Dorsey experienced her first unexplained fall. Eight months later, the then-45-year-old marathoner was diagnosed with chronic progressive multiple sclerosis.

Since that initial diagnosis, Lay-Dorsey, an artist, photographer and retired social worker, has used art and poetry to process her feelings about her condition. In 2006, she became serious about photography and for the past five and a half years, has worked on an intensive self-portrait project documenting her experience living with MS.

Fifty of those images have been compiled into a book, "Falling into Place," published byFfotogallery this month. Lay-Dorsey plans to distribute the book to universities, doctor's offices, non-profits and other outlets in the hope that the images will educate viewers about the reality of life with a disability, as well as inspire those living with their own challenges. 


Read the full article at CBS News

(http://www.cbsnews.com/pictures/photographing-a-full-life-with-a-disability/)

Comment

Comment

Mental Illnesses Taking The Form Of Real Monsters

Artist Toby Allen visualizes what illnesses like anxiety, depression and paranoia would look like if they were monsters. He creates a chilling picture of the illnesses that no one can see, but that many confront in their daily life.

Anxiety

Anxiety

“Anxiety is small enough to sit on its victim’s shoulder and whisper things in to their unconscious, eliciting fearful thoughts and irrational worries. The anxiety monster is often seen as weak in comparison to others, but it is one of the most common and is very hard to get rid of. They often carry small objects linked to their victim’s anxieties such as clocks which represent a common but irrational fear of things that might never happen. No one has ever seen the face of the anxiety monster for it always wears a skull as a mask.”
Social Anxiety

Social Anxiety

“The Social Anxiety monster spends most of its life underground or in secluded sheltered areas. Because of this their skin appears pale and anemic, apart from hard plates that serve as an unnecessary means of defense. They are from the same biological family as the anxiety and paranoia monsters but due to their extreme way of life they have evolved to look quite different.”
“The monster spends most of its time in hibernation but will project their auras into human hosts in the hope of living out the ordinary lives they can never have. In the process, the monster passes on its own anxieties to its victims so both monster and the human host similar irrational social fears and worries.”
Read the full article at Buzzfeed 
http://www.buzzfeed.com/hzwonder/mental-illnesses-take-the-form-of-real-life-monste-fc1u

Comment

Comment

Smithsonian To Spotlight Artists With Disabilities

By 
A group of emerging artists with disabilities from across the country will take center stage at the Smithsonian Institution this fall.
The Washington, D.C. landmark will feature works of photography, painting and sculpture, among other mediums, from 15 artists with disabilities ages 16 to 25...
Read more via Disability Scoop 
http://www.disabilityscoop.com/2013/09/17/smithsonian-spotlight-artists/18727/

Comment

Comment

Richard Turner: My review of the film ‘A life without words’

Posted on October 7, 2013

I recently watched one of the most moving films I have ever seen. It was called A Life Without Words and it raised a lot of questions in my mind. It made me realise just how much we take for granted in this country and how hard it really is for many Deaf people living in the developing world with no access to basic healthcare services, audiology, education and even language.
Image
I went to see the documentary at the Royal College of Medicine in Central London. After the showing, there was a panel discussion with the film’s director, Adam Isenberg, and three other people. Dr Michael York, an anthropologist from University College London (UCL) chaired the panel discussion.
http://limpingchicken.com/2013/10/07/richard-turner-my-review-of-the-film-a-life-without-words/

Comment

Comment

Welcoming Art Lovers With Disabilities


ON a recent Friday night, the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York held its first public exhibition of original art made in its “Seeing Through Drawing” classes. Participants — all blind or partly sighted — created works inspired by objects in the museum’s collection that were described to them by sighted instructors and that they were also allowed to touch.

In another gallery, a tour in American Sign Language was followed by a reception for deaf visitors. And on select Fridays, new “multisensory stations” invite all guests — including those with a range of disabilities — to experience exhibits though scent, touch, music and verbal imaging, or describing things for people with vision impairment.
“The Met has a long history of accessibility for people with disabilities,” said Rebecca McGinnis, who oversees access and community programs. As early as 1908, the museum provided a “rolling chair” for people with mobility issues, and in 1913 held talks for blind public school children, she said. Today, there are programs for people with disabilities nearly every day...

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/10/27/arts/artsspecial/welcoming-art-lovers-with-disabilities.html?_r=1&

Comment

Comment

This Adorable Teenage Girl With Down Syndrome Just Became Wet Seal’s Newest Model

by 

Meet Karrie Brown, she’s a 17-year-old model who just got a gig with Wet Seal. She also has Down syndrome.

Meet Karrie Brown, she's a 17-year-old model who just got a gig with Wet Seal. She also has Down syndrome.

Karrie’s mom discovered that Wet Seal started carrying plus-sized clothing, which according toKarrie’s Facebook, is a great fit for girls with Down syndrome.

Karrie started sharing photos of herself on Facebook in different Wet Seal outfits and it turned into a petition to get Wet Seal to feature Karrie as one of their models.

Karrie started sharing photos of herself on Facebook in different Wet Seal outfits and it turned into a petition to get Wet Seal to feature Karrie as one of their models.

Read full article via Buzzfeed 

http://www.buzzfeed.com/ryanhatesthis/this-adorable-teenage-girl-with-down-syndrome-just-became-we

Comment

Comment

The Representation Of Disability On Television Is Alive And Well: But Is It Authentic?

Posted on:  


Comment

Comment

Game of Thrones wins award honoring disability awareness

By Winter Is Coming


Comment

Comment

Study: Average Person Becomes Unhinged Psychotic When Alone In Own House



Once in the confines of their own home, the average human being becomes what can only be described as clinically insane, researchers say.
ISSUE 49•36 • Sep 6, 2013 ITHACA, NY—Citing a range of behavior that experts could only describe as “profoundly disturbed,” a new study released by Cornell University’s psychology department Thursday revealed that most otherwise normal people transform into complete psychotics when alone in the confines of their own homes.

The study, conducted in the households of millions of Americans over an 11-month period, states that from the moment the average person sets foot inside their front door, they begin exhibiting wildly unhinged mannerisms, including loudly talking to themselves; suddenly snapping their fingers for brief, three-to-five-second bursts for no reason whatsoever; and walking into their bathrooms, staring into the mirror, inflating their cheeks while making a grotesque face, and then leaving as if what they did was completely normal.

Read the full article at the Onion 
(http://www.theonion.com/articles/study-average-person-becomes-unhinged-psychotic-wh,33762/?ref=auto)

Comment

Comment

Deaf and blind artist wins award


Minerva Hussain with his award-winning work.Minerva Hussain with his award-winning work.
  • Minerva Hussain with his award-winning work.
  • A close-up shot of the detail Minerva put into his Chester Zoo piece with the monorail, safari truck and a host of animals cheekily peeping from behind the shrubs and trees in their enclosures.
  • Minerva created this textured representation of Tutankhamun when studying at Mid Cheshire College.


A DEAF artist has been commended for his intricate work based on Chester Zoo – made all the more remarkable because he has been blind since he was a teenager.
Minerva Hussain has Usher syndrome, which started to affect his sight when he was 18, gradually getting worse until he was left with just peripheral vision.
But the 44-year-old uses photographs, a magnifying glass and his memory to create vivid, incredibly detailed and tactile work that the viewer can see with their fingers as well as their eyes.
His Chester Zoo collage is full of different animals hiding and peeping from behind thick paper foliage and stiff cardboard fences, the enclosures are covered in glassy plastic, and he has included safari trucks, a ticket office and the zoo’s much-loved monorail.
“It was hard work, especially with my sight, to do everything myself,” he said.
“I cut out everything – there was a lot of sweat involved when I was sat down cutting things out and I had to make sure there was plenty of light so I could see everything.
“It took five weeks to do.”
Read the full article and view the video at Northwich Guardian 

Comment

Comment

Life as an autistic triplet: The startlingly intimate images that reveal the daily routine of 18-year-old brothers who ALL suffer from the same condition




A photographer has captured candid and incredibly moving photographs of teenage triplets, all of whom suffer from autism.

Over the course of two years, José Antonio de Lamadrid, 50, from Seville, has followed three 18-year-old brothers who were all born with the same complex neurological disorder.

Mr Lamadrid wanted to follow Alejandro, Álvaro and Jaime Morillo Aguilar because he was fascinated and touched by their interaction. 

Mr Lamadrid also has personal experience of the condition as his nephew is autistic.

Jaime, Alejandro and Alvaro
Here Jaime, Alejandro and Álvaro (left to right) are on their way to school in their parent's car. It took three years for them to be diagnosed with the complex neurological disorder

The condition is characterised by a difficulty to communicate and socialise yet the three men have a visibly strong brotherly bond.
 
The men's parents, Noelia and Jaime, said that it was shortly after their sons turned one that they started to notice differences between them and children of the same age.

They said that the boys did not respond to their calls and seemed disinterested by things that should have fascinated the them - planes in the sky, barking dogs and offerings of sweets all went unnoticed.

Triplets
Here the triplets' clothing is laid on the bed they sleep in during summer. They like to wear the same clothes as each other

Alejandro
Isolated: Alejandro is pictured in the school playground. The image captures how difficult it can be for autistic people to interact with their peers and the wider world

Jaime and Alejandro
Every day, Jaime and Alejandro write their diary, documenting exactly what they have done, including minute details such as playing on their Nintendo console. Those with autism tend to be obsessive about their routine

Jaime and Alejandro
This photograph captures the touching moment that father Jaime washes and shaves his son, Alejandro. Despite their age, the triplets will remain childlike and vulnerable for the rest of their life

It took three years and a raft of tests for them to be diagnosed. They were not deaf, there were not obvious genetic ot neurological problems.

'When you do not have any of these symptoms, you have autism,' Noelia said.

Álvaro suffers with the most severe learning difficulties out of the three because he suffered a brain injury in childhood. As a result he attends a specialised autism centre. 

Alejandro and Alvaro
Alejandro and Álvaro may be 18-years-old but their condition makes them remarkably childlike. Here they are photographed playing cowboys at home

Alejandro
Alejandro is fixated by an image of himself in a mirror of a supermarket. Autism removes a person's understanding of what is acceptable in social situations

His brothers Alejandro and Jaime however attend the local high school that offers special classes to help them integrate with those unaffected by the condition.

As with many people suffering autism, the men are very keen to stick to a routine.

They tirelessly document their days - even recording the minutiae of atching TV, washing the dishes and, as one diary entry says, 'eating a coconut yoghurt and playing Nintendo'.

Every Friday the men go to the town library to rent out movies. They also visit their local leisure centre to socialise with other children who have autism.

Jaime
Here Jaime enjoys being pampered by his mother and aunt in preparation for a costume party. The photographer's images give a rare insight into the complex world of men living with a condition that remains relatively misunderstood

Álvaro
Álvaro always carries small objects in his hands - everyday items that he calls 'inventions'. Autism is often characterised by obsessive tendencies, such as becoming fixated by seemingly unimportant objects

triplets
Here the brothers play, supervised by a social worker, while they wait to be picked up by their parents from their weekly club. Every Friday they play games and meet other people with autism at a local recreation centre

Alejandro is an accomplished artist and enjoys playing puzzles. 

Since the age of six he has been able to complete 1000-piece jigsaws in a matter of hours. 

Álvaro, always carries what he refers to as 'inventions'. Objects include clay figures and everyday household objects such as combs, pegs, scissors and pencils.

Jaime has a incredible memory - for example, if he is given a date he is able to tell you what day of the week it was, even if it was many years ago.

View the whole article at Daily Mail 

Comment

Comment

Photographer Captures His Twin Brother’s Cerebral Palsy Through Breathtaking Images


By: Tasneem Nashrulla / posted on August 23, 2013 at 5:30pm 


For 13 years, Christopher Capozziello dealt with the grief and guilt of being the “healthy” brother by photographing his cerebral palsy-afflicted twin.



Christoper Capozziello, a Connecticut-based freelance photographer, started taking pictures of Nick, his twin brother who has cerebral palsy, when they were 20. Now, 13 years later, Christopher wants to tell their story through a book, The Distance Between Us, which is being funded by a Kickstarter campaign.

Christopher spoke to BuzzFeed about the experience of capturing his brother and their relationship through the years.

“I first began making pictures of my brother at a time when I was trying to understand the kind of photographer I was becoming.”

"I first began making pictures of my brother at a time when I was trying to understand the kind of photographer I was becoming."
“Without any intention of telling our story, it emerged years later out of a steadily growing archive that chronicled his experiences and unknowingly at that point, my grief.”

“In the very beginning he didn’t like it, so I would sneak one or two pictures and then he’d realize what I was doing, and he’d turn his face away from my camera or flip me the bird.”

"In the very beginning he didn’t like it, so I would sneak one or two pictures and then he’d realize what I was doing, and he’d turn his face away from my camera or flip me the bird."
“One of the earliest pictures was of him in bed, waking from a cramp. I walked into our bedroom, and the sunlight on him looked beautiful. I crouched to make a picture and the shutter from my old Nikon was so loud that it startled him. He punched me in the face.”
View the full article at Buzzfeed

Comment

Comment

Man with OCD Blows Internet Away with Hauntingly Stirring Love Poem



When a poem is powerful enough to get the Internet to stop and take notice, you know it must be something truly special.
And Neil Hilborn's love poem "OCD" absolutely is.
Performed during the Individual Finals of this year's Rustbelt Regional Poetry Slam, Hilborn's ode to love in the time of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder is poignantly punctuated by the poet's palpable on-stage struggle with nervous tics threatening to derail the entire thing.
After a video of a recital rushed to the top of Reddit this morning, Hilborn made a surprise appearance in the thread to take questions from his newfound fans.
In his responses, Hilborn confirmed that he has undergone extensive therapy over the past several years which has helped substantially reduce the intensity of his symptoms.
He also reveals that the poem was originally written some two years ago, and the girl in question has heard it, which lead to an appropriately revolving relationship of getting back together and splitting up a number of times before Hilborn finally called it off.
If you're looking for more from Hilborn, make sure to check out his other Rustbelt entry, "Mating Habits of the North American Hipster" — the only performance in the entire tournament to earn a perfect score.




Read more at the Gawker 



Comment

Comment

Artists 'better protected' against dementia, study finds


Music and art are less vulnerable to cognitive decline, Canadian neurologists say

Posted: Aug 22, 2013 5:03 PM ET 

Last Updated: Aug 22, 2013 10:58 PM ET


Art and music are less vulnerable to cognitive decline, a new Canadian study suggests.
Neurologists at St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto found that artists suffering from vascular dementia may still be able to draw spontaneously and from memory, despite being unable to complete simple, everyday tasks.
"We discovered that there is a disproportion between the degree that artists lose some of their memory function, their orientation and other day-to-day cognitive functions. But at the same time, some of their art form is preserved," Dr. Luis Fornazzari, a neurological consultant at St. Michael’s Hospital memory clinic and lead author of the paper, told CBC News.
Artists compared with non-artists are better protected, he added. "Due to their art, the brain is better protected [against] diseases like Alzheimer's, vascular dementia, and even strokes. They have more reserve in their brain in order to give functions.
Read more at CBC News 

Comment

Comment

I spent 20 hours on wheelchair: Guru Syed Sallauddin Pasha



Comment

Comment

Messi draws disabled children to sport

Posted Friday, Aug. 09, 2013

Valentino is a fan of the River Plate soccer club who dreams of dodging down the field like Argentine star Lionel Messi. Adrian wants to score goals like his hero, former Boca Juniors standout Martin Palermo. Eugenia and Sofia just want to have fun with the ball.
All four must use joysticks to get around in motorized wheelchairs, but they're still getting a taste of their dreams. They're among the 50 or so youngsters who recently began playing Powerchair Football in Buenos Aires.
The sport, which began in France in 1978 and now has active leagues in the United States, has finally reached football-mad Argentina, providing an enjoyable outlet for quadriplegics and others who can't walk because of multiple sclerosis, muscular dystrophy, paralysis or spinal cord injuries.
Read more at Star Telegram 

Read more here: http://www.star-telegram.com/2013/08/09/5068969/ap-photos-golazo-disabled-kids.html#storylink=cpy

Comment

Comment

Autism-Friendly Performance: OKLAHOMA!


What is an Autism-Friendly Performance?

Autism-Friendly Performances are designed and intended for families with children on the autism spectrum or who have other sensory issues. At these performances the theater environment will be altered, providing a safe, sensory-friendly, comfortable and judgment-free space that is welcoming for these families. Autism-Friendly Performances are recommended for those families bringing a loved one have a developmental disability, and their teachers and advocates who are familiar with and accepting of behaviors exhibited by some individuals with autism.

FAQs

Q: Is this performance only for families of children with autism or other sensory issues, or can anyone attend?A: Autism-Friendly Performances are intended primarily for families with children on the autism spectrum or who have other sensory issues. In addition to altering the theater environment to cater to those with sensory issues, a main goal of this program is to provide a safe, judgment-free, comfortable experience for the entire family. We achieve this by recommending this performance for those families bringing loved ones who have a developmental disability, and their advocates who are familiar with and accepting of behaviors exhibited by some children with autism.
Read the full article at Boston Conservatory where showtimes, ticket pricing and full synopsis can be found. 

Comment