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Pinkwash? For Every $100 Of NFL Pink Merchandise Sales, Only $3.54 Goes Toward Cancer Research


by Rick Chandler | 8:45 pm, October 9th, 2013
The NFL, meanwhile, keeps $45: making it a huge moneymaker for a league that already enjoys nonprofit tax-exempt status. (The league says that it doesn’t actually profit from this, however. See below). So should the NFL get flagged for “pinkwashing”: exploiting a good cause for its own benefit? With its Breast Cancer Awareness “Crucial Catch Campaign” Month, is the league more interested in promoting its brand — especially among women — than it is in actually helping a good cause?
According to Business Insider, the NFL is keeping approximately 90 percent of money from sales of Breast Cancer Awareness gear, like that towel above. And of the money that the American Cancer Society does receive, less than 80 percent of that goes toward actual research.
When we contacted the NFL’s online shop for clarification, we were told 5% of the sales are being donated to the American Cancer Society. If the pink products have a typical 100% mark-up at retail, that means the NFL is keeping 90% of the profit from the sale of Breast Cancer Awareness gear.
And then consider that only 70.8% of money the ACS receives goes towards research and cancer programs. So, for every $100 in sales of pink gear, only $3.54 is going towards research while the NFL is keeping approximately $45 (based on 100% mark-up).

Read more at Sports Grid

(http://www.sportsgrid.com/nfl/pinkwash-for-every-100-of-nfl-pink-merchandise-sales-only-3-54-goes-toward-cancer-research/) 

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10 Things The Media Should Stop Doing When Discussing Disabilities

Posted on:  

The media loves to think they know everything. They love being in on the latest “it” thing, acting like they’re hip and can relate to the people. However, they never seem to care about stepping it up when it comes to referring to people with disabilities in the most appropriate way.
The written and spoken word is constantly evolving too. The media knows when to use “twerk” and “tweet,” but would it kill them to stop saying “wheelchair-bound?”
If the way the media discusses disabilities makes you cringe, read on for the top ten things the media should stop doing when discussing disabilities.
1) Stop saying “wheelchair-bound.”
A term nearly as old as the wheelchair itself, the term “wheelchair-bound” needs to be left in the antique store with its wooden wheelchair-counterpart. Seriously, who says this anymore? Saying “Tiffiny is wheelchair-bound” is absolutely the wrong way to refer to someone who uses a wheelchair, yet the media does it all the time.
We are not bound by our wheelchairs. How can we be “bound” by something that makes us so independent? If anything, it should be more like “the chair is human-bounded” rather than the “person is wheelchair-bound.” We overtake the wheelchair and make it our own. I even think some of us would even put nano-technology into our bodies if it was possible. What should they say instead? Look for the answer below.
Read the full article at the Mobility Resource 
(http://www.themobilityresource.com/10-things-mainstream-media-should-stop-doing-when-discussing-disabilities/)

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Disabled Opportunity: The Entertainment Industry’s Discriminating Against Me

Posted by Ru Porter on 12/02/13 | Filed under Opinion

To become famous, you have to have a uniqueness that separates you from everyone else. But in some cases standing out can be a hindrance – especially if you’re disabled.

The film, music and television industries are already highly competitive and for individuals with physical handicaps achieving a high level of success is even slimmer. Additionally, there aren’t many public figures to represent Americans with disabilities on a mainstream level, which is why networks like NBC would rather hire able-bodied actors such as Blair Underwood to play a paraplegic detective on their latest cop drama, "Ironside". The show, which was part of NBC’s Fall 2013-14 programming, is a reboot of a 1960's drama touting the same name; and chronicles the life of an undercover officer who gets injured and confined to a wheelchair. To some, Ironside’s premise may sound unappealing, but personally I thought the pitch was great – not just because Underwood’s character is disabled, but also because it shed light on a topic that rarely gets any shine.

Read the full article at Refined Hype

(http://www.refinedhype.com/hyped/entry/disabled-chances)

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Disabled woman denied entry to U.S. after agent cites supposedly private medical details

By:  News reporter, Published on Thu Nov 28 2013
Ellen Richardson went to Pearson airport on Monday full of joy about flying to New York City and from there going on a 10-day Caribbean cruise for which she’d paid about $6,000.
But a U.S. Customs and Border Protection agent with the Department of Homeland Security killed that dream when hedenied her entry.
“I was turned away, I was told, because I had a hospitalization in the summer of 2012 for clinical depression,’’ said Richardson, who is a paraplegic and set up her cruise in collaboration with a March of Dimes group of about 12 others.

The Weston woman was told by the U.S. agent she would have to get “medical clearance’’ and be examined by one of only three doctors in Toronto whose assessments are accepted by Homeland Security. She was given their names and told a call to her psychiatrist “would not suffice.’’

Read the full article at The Star

(http://www.thestar.com/news/gta/2013/11/28/disabled_woman_denied_entry_to_us_after_agent_cites_supposedly_private_medical_details.html)

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U.N. disability treaty won't protect the rights of wounded veterans

BY JAMES JAY CARAFANO | NOVEMBER 24, 2013 AT 9:33 AM 


It has bounced around the Senate for more than a year without winning ratification. Yet supporters of the United Nations' Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities are back, pushing for yet another vote before senators head home for Christmas.
Progressives embrace the treaty as another step toward creating a set of universal standards that will enable all mankind to live in peace and harmony. But many conservatives view the treaty as an infringement on American sovereignty with little chance of making the world a better place.
Over the years, America’s military has fought mightily to preserve that sovereignty. Many of those fighters have paid the ultimate price. And many more have been severely disabled.
Read more at the Washington Examiner 

(http://washingtonexaminer.com/article/2539684)

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#heardwhilstdisabled: Things said to disabled people

By Damon Rose

The #heardwhilstdisabled hashtag is doing good business on Twitter. Parodying "overheard in the office" columns, disabled social media users are contributing uncomfortable glimpses into their lives by sharing the things the public can say.
The subsequent tweets are full of fascinating misunderstandings and bigger examples of being patronised, which can sometimes materially affect lives and the way disabled people want to live.
Here's a selection:
  • "I'd give anything to be sick like you and be thin"
  • "You're smiling - you can't be in that much pain"
  • "If she was my kid, I'd have her walking by now"
  • "So, is your daughter normal then?"
  • "Isn't it lovely to see them out and about?"
  • "People don't want to see people with disabilities on stage - they've come out to have a nice time"
  • "People like you should be in homes, it's not fair that the rest of us have to deal with your problems"
Baroness Tanni Grey-Thompson is not immune either. She tweeted: "[D]id you really think about getting pregnant because people like you will find it hard."
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/blogs-ouch-24064300

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The Sun's fearmongering about mental health is what's really monstrous

BY LAURIE PENNY PUBLISHED 07 OCTOBER 2013

"1,200 killed by mental patients." Today's drooling Sun headline plays on precisely the kind of fearmongering that people with mental health problems have come to fear most, implying that they are violent, unstable monsters - as well as lazy benefit scroungers making up their illnesses in order to milk the system. The headline is entirely misleading. In fact, the most recent available figures show that "there has been a fall  in homicide by people with mental illness, including people with psychosis" since 2004.
The Sun claims that, far from seeking to stigmatise the mentally ill, its cover story draws attention to how many have been let down by poor mental health provision over the past decade. That's why it led with the sort of weary sensationalist headline that exploits prejudice against the sick and vulnerable to sell papers...
http://www.newstatesman.com/newspapers/2013/10/suns-fearmongering-about-mental-health-whats-really-monstrous

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Spanish hoops team used nondisabled ringers to win Paralympic gold

10/14/2013


Call them especially despicable Olympians. Justice has finally caught up with Fernando Martin Vicente, the Spanish sports official who sent a team stocked with nondisabled athletes to win the gold medal in intellectually disabled basketball at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics. Team member Carlos Ribagorda copped to the scam shortly after the conclusion of the Games, saying at least 15 Spanish athletes had no physical or mental handicap, including 10 of the 12 on the basketball team. During one blowout win, Ribagorda said his coach told players, "Move down a gear, or they’ll figure out you’re not disabled." Spanish athletes were asked to return their medals, but only this week was Vicente hit with $200,000 in fines and penalties by a Madrid court. Charges were dropped against 18 others athletes and officials.

via MSN

http://now.msn.com/fernando-martin-vicente-spanish-sports-official-sent-nondisabled-athletes-to-win-2000-paralympic-gold-medal-in-basketball

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Blind People 'Face Increasing Lack Of Support'




Guide dog
Video: Many local authorities are restricting rehabilitation help for the blind
Enlarge





















By Rhiannon Mills, Sky Reporter
Blind people are being left to fend for themselves - and in less than 10 years could have no support from local councils, a leading charity has warned.
The Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB) said there had been a 43% drop in the number of blind and partially sighted people getting even basic council support.
That is down from 55,875 people to 31,740 since 2005, according to the RNIB's Facing Blindness Alone study.
But the charity fears that in just 10 years' time not a single blind or partially sighted person will receive any support from their council if the trend continues.
The research also found that a growing number of local authorities are restricting access to rehabilitation or only offering a six-week course.
Read more at News Sky
(http://news.sky.com/story/1139513/blind-people-face-increasing-lack-of-support)

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Deaf News: Deaf swimmer “kicked off lifeguard course for being deaf”


Posted on September 3, 2013

Unbelievably, a champion Deaf swimmer, who represented the UK at the World Deaf Swimming Champtionships,  has been kicked off a lifeguard course in the third week of training for being deaf.
A champion swimmer and Commonwealth Games hopeful has been kicked off a lifeguard training course because he is deaf.
James Webster, 21, of Rossiter Road, Tooting, is a deaf competitor for Great Britain.
The rising star has dreams to compete in the Commonwealth Games and was hoping to fund his training by working as a lifeguard.
He enrolled on a National Pool Lifeguard Qualification (NPLQ) course at Tooting Leisure Centre last month, passing level one of the course within a few weeks.
But as he entered the third week of the course he was told by his tutor he could not continue, because he is deaf.
Instructors told him he would not be able to do the job as he would not be able to hear people breathing and would struggle to communicate with colleagues.
The Institute of Qualified Lifeguards said they cannot always accept candidates who have poor vision or hearing.
A publication by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) also states lifeguards must have good hearing.
Mr Webster, who communicates using sign language and lip reading, is now seeking legal advice.
Update: We have found a deaf lifeguard
Read the full article at the Limping Chicken 
(http://limpingchicken.com/2013/09/03/deaf-news-deaf-swimmer-kicked-off-lifeguard-course-for-being-deaf/)

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Is it too difficult for people with disabilities to find volunteering roles?


disabled volunteer
Disabled volunteer Michael Duggan giving out directions. Photograph: Tom Jenkins for the Guardian

Research by Disability Rights UK and Community Service Volunteershas found evidence that many people with disabilities are experiencing a surprising level of difficulty in finding volunteering roles.
Earlier this year the organisations ran four seminars across England, interviewing disabled people to find out what barriers were stopping them from volunteering. Sue Bott, director of policy and development at Disability Rights UK, says that some who attended the sessions had been waiting for up to four years for a role.
"One of the main barriers is the attitude of organisations in the voluntary sector," she says. "There are a lot of assumptions about disabled people. Rather than thinking about what they can offer, organisations tend to imagine some of the perceived problems having disabled volunteers will cause them."
Read the full article at the Guardian 

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Cryptic Leaflet Threatens To Expose ‘Disabled’


By 
In what officials are calling the work of a hate group, fliers have appeared in several Portland, Ore. neighborhoods threatening to out people with disabilities who receive government aid.
Portland officials are asking for help from the public after learning of the leaflets found in at least five neighborhoods.
“There are sixteen people in this neighborhood who vote and receive cash disability payments,” reads one of the typed notes signed by “Artemis of the wildland.”
“The names of these people are being posted where they can be seen by taxpayers and the neighborhood can decide who is truly disabled,” the note continues. “Some of us in the neighborhood wish to save this democracy and to stand in the way of those who would destroy it.”
Read more at Disability Scoop 

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Claim: Airline Forced Man With Special Needs To Crawl


By 
A Hawaii man who relies on a wheelchair says that Delta Air Lines left him no choice but to crawl on and off its airplanes more than once while traveling cross-country, according to a federal lawsuit.
Baraka Kanaan, who is unable to walk as a result of partial paralysis in his legs, claims that he “was forced to crawl across an airport tarmac, up and down the stairs of an airplane, down the aisle of the aircraft and out of and into his seat” on two different occasions while traveling between Hawaii and Massachusetts in July 2012.
In the suit filed last week in U.S. District Court in Hawaii, Kanaan alleges that Delta violated the Air Carrier Access Act, which requires that airlines and airports “provide boarding assistance to individuals with disabilities by using ramps, mechanical lifts or other suitable devices where level-entry boarding by loading bridge or mobile lounge is not available.” The rule applies to any aircraft that can seat 31 or more passengers.
Read more at Disability Scoop 

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No review board into early deaths of patients with learning disabilities

No review board into early deaths of patients with learning disabilities

Ministers refuse to implement inquiry recommendation for a national body to investigate 1,200 premature deaths in the NHS
People with learning disabilities at the Tower Drive Daycare Centre in Milton Keynes
, social affairs editor / guardian.co.uk, 
Ministers have refused to create a national body to investigate the 1,200 premature deaths a year of patients with learning disabilities in the NHS – a key recommendation of a three-year confidential inquiry – drawing fire from campaigners and the government's own researchers.
The confidential inquiry, set up at the end of the last Labour government, found that patients with a learning disability experience delays in diagnosis, delays in treatment, lack of basic care and poor communication by doctors and nurses.
Carried out by Bristol University academics and funded by the Department of Health, the inquiry "highlighted the unacceptable situation in which people with learning disabilities die, on average, 16 years sooner than people without learning disabilities". Almost two-fifths – 37% – of deaths of people with a learning disability were due to them not getting the right care.
Read more at the Guardian 

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Why is it acceptable for an able-bodied actor to play a disabled character?


Why is it acceptable for an able-bodied actor to play a disabled character?

We no longer accept white actors blacking up – yet the able-bodied Daniel Radcliffe is playing a physically disabled character in the West End. How come?


Thursday 20 June 2013 

As I've written here recently, it's increasingly obvious that there's still a long way to go to increase employment opportunities for black and east Asian actors. Companies, directors, and casting directors need to be more alert to the decisions they make around recruiting actors. But what about opportunities for disabled actors?

Jenny Sealey, artistic director of the disabled-led theatre companyGraeae and co-artistic director of the 2012 Paralympics Opening Ceremony, pointed out in an interview I did with her last year that prejudice against disabled actors remains rife. She cited the example of someone who told her that, if a play wasn't conceived by its writer to be performed by a disabled cast, and you cast an actor who was a wheelchair user, the play would become about that. "I was speechless," said Sealey. "Nobody would say that casting a black actor makes a play become about that – so why is a wheelchair user any different?"

Why indeed. But whereas it would now be unthinkable for a white actor to black up to play Othello, it seems that most of us don't even blink when able-bodied actors play disabled roles. In fact, there is perhaps no quicker way to glory at awards ceremonies, particularly in Hollywood movies. Jon Voight and Daniel Day-Lewis both won Oscars for cinematic portrayals of disabled characters...
Read the whole story at The Guardian 

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Philanthropic NFL Player Battling Lou Gehrig’s Disease Mocked By Now-Fired Radio Hosts

posted on June 18, 2013 at 12:19pm
By: Kevin Lincoln

From 2000–2006, Steve Gleason played defensive back for the New Orleans Saints.

From 2000–2006, Steve Gleason played defensive back for the New Orleans Saints.
Image by Tom Berg/NFLPhotoLibrary / Getty Images

Gleason mostly made his career as a reserve safety and special teamer, and there’s a statue outside the New Orleans Superdome commemorating a punt he blocked during the first Superdome game following Hurricane Katrina.

Gleason mostly made his career as a reserve safety and special teamer, and there's a statue outside the New Orleans Superdome commemorating a punt he blocked during the first Superdome game following Hurricane Katrina.
Image by Gerald Herbert / AP

In 2011, Gleason announced he’d been diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) or Lou Gehrig’s disease. Since then, he’s been active in the New Orleans community as an advocate for ALS sufferers. He has lost nearly all of his motor functions.

In 2011, Gleason announced he'd been diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) or Lou Gehrig's disease. Since then, he's been active in the New Orleans community as an advocate for ALS sufferers. He has lost nearly all of his motor functions.
Image by Gerald Herbert, File / AP
That’s the setup. This is the story: Because of his disease — a diagnosis of ALS usually results in death after three to five years — Gleason communicates via a computer that he controls by blinking. And he wrote an essay about his disease and his family via the same means, which Sports Illustrated’s Peter King ran as his column this week. It’s emotionally touching, and it’s intellectually impressive in its analysis of what science can and can’t offer us as people. It’s worth reading in full.
Read the whole story via Buzzfeed 

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Basildon Hospital criticised over death of disabled woman

May 21, 2013


A hospital being investigated over high death rates "missed opportunities" to save the life of a disabled woman, according to the health Ombudsman.
Tina Papalabropoulos, 23, died in Basildon Hospital in Essex in 2009.
When Miss Papalabropoulos went to the hospital after it was thought food had got into her lungs the doctors did not treat her condition, the report said.
The trust which runs the hospital said it had made significant improvement to the care and treatment it provided.
'An existence'
The trust was criticised for allowing her to eat and drink, failing immediately to administer antibiotics and for not considering moving her to the "high dependency" unit.
"We found that (Tina's) doctors had missed any opportunity there might have been - however small - to save her life by providing earlier and more intensive treatment for her," the Ombudsman said.


The report also criticised an out-of-hours GP for refusing to visit Miss Papalabropoulos, whose medical conditions included learning disabilities and epilepsy, in the run-up to her hospital stay, despite a plea from her mother.
Christine Papalabropoulos not only criticised those who were supposed to be caring for her daughter but said she believed too many doctors viewed people with learning disabilities as merely leading an "existence" and not having a life.
"Vulnerable people like my daughter have been suffering this kind of care for decades," she said.
"They see it as 'this is not a life, this is just an existence', so they do not use all of their expertise.
"That's wrong. This child is loved by all the people, family and friends they come in contact with.
"This child is a human being. They just happen to be born with a disability."

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David Cameron: Forcing disabled people out of their homes because of the bedroom tax makes no sense


By 
12 May 2013


David Cameron has admitted that forcing disabled people out of their homes with his hated bedroom tax “makes no sense”.
The shock admission was made after the PM was asked to personally intervene in the case of Iris Henderson, 59, who was born with dwarfism.
Under the bedroom tax, Iris faces losing a quarter of her housing benefit unless she moves out of her specially adapted house.
She has spent thousands on her home to cater for her disability, including £4500 to have the appliances and units in her kitchen made lower.
In a letter, Cameron claimed tenants such as Iris, who suffers from arthritis and osteoporosis and needs crutches to walk, shouldn’t get full benefits while living in modified homes with spare bedrooms.
But he admitted in a letter to Iris’s MP Gregg McClymont that it made “no sense” for someone whose home had undergone big alterations to move.

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Disability Rights: Cornish Councillor Colin Brewer Compares Disabled Children To Deformed Lambs



Huffington Post UK  |  By  Posted: 
The Cornish councillor who was re-elected despite saying that disabled children "should be put down because they cost too much money" has again insisted that there may be a case for killing some disabled children with high support needs.
Speaking to Disability News Service, Colin Brewer said he was not the "ogre" he had been made out to be, adding that constituents in his rural ward had shaken his hand and congratulated him, despite his controversial comments.
Looking for analogies to support his view, Brewer compared disabled children to farmers' treatment of animals, telling the agency: “If they have a misshapen lamb, they get rid of it. They get rid of it. Bang!”
He continued: "We are just animals. He [the farmer] obviously has got a point… You can’t have lambs running around with five legs and two heads.”
Brewer said: “It [the lamb] would be put down, smashed against the wall and be dealt with.”
He said the financial "burden" of the disabled wasn't just his own personal concern”, adding: “If you are talking about giving services to the community or services to the individual, the balance has got to be struck.”
Brewer said: “I keep as far away from health in the council as I can.”
However he sought to justify his original comments by saying that that had suffered a series of strokes before the incident, which might explain why he “flared up”. "People have said I have changed since those strokes,” he added.
Independent councillor Brewer made the comments to Theresa Court, who works for Disability Cornwall, while she was manning a stall at the County Hall in Truro in October 2011.

Despite facing calls to resign, he remained defiant over his right to remain in his councillor role and gained 335 votes in the last election, beating the Lib Dem candidate by two votes.
He wrote a letter of apology to Theresa Court and said at the time: "I have no intention of resigning. I don't think I have done anything wrong. I have apologised."

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Kiondre Davison, Mentally Disabled Teen, Held In Solitary For 25 Days At Colorado ‘Treatment' Facility


The Colorado Independent  |  By Susan GreenePosted:  

Fourteen-year-old Kiondre Davison had a habit of acting up in school and running away from home. Social services officials stepped in to help. They sent him to El Pueblo Boys and Girls Ranch, a teen treatment center that touts its “environment of safety and loving care.”
Kiondre – with an IQ of 62 and an array of developmental disabilities – bickered with staffers, fought with other kids and exhibited what the Pueblo-based center documented as a pattern of inappropriate behavior. Its form of treatment: forcing him to spend at least 25 consecutive days last year in one of its “reflections cottages” — spaces that, despite the pleasant name, Kiondre describes as “hell.”
“Reflection,” as practiced in many cases at El Pueblo, is a form of solitary confinement in a cement cell. For some teens at the center, state investigators have found, reflection means no school, outdoor exercise or interaction with other kids. Kiondre didn’t really understand why he was put into isolation or how long it would last. He says the three and a half weeks or more he spent locked in solitude, unable to watch TV, read a book or see his mom “seemed like five or six months.”
“I’m not so good with stuff like months and weeks. All I know is it was long, real long, and it felt like the worst thing ever. I mean, ever,” he says.
El Pueblo voluntarily has shut down its reflections cottages as Colorado’s Department of Human Services investigates how many kids besides Kiondre have been forced into isolation there. Following a complaint by the American Civil Liberties Union of Colorado last month, state regulators issued a report on describing as well-founded ACLU allegations that:
  • Kids are locked and placed in solitary confinement in El Pueblo’s “reflections cottages”
  • Children have not been provided adequate education programs during their stays in “reflection”
  • And youth in El Pueblo “are not provided recreation, exercise or outdoor activity.”
El Pueblo President and CEO Sherri Baca touts reflection as a way to “provide a clinical intervention for the residents in crisis.”
“The Cottages are an important element in the continuum of care available to our kids,” she said in a prepared statement, noting that her center looks forward to working with Human Services officials in their evaluation of its program.

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