Viewing entries in
"Paralympic"

Comment

Spanish hoops team used nondisabled ringers to win Paralympic gold

10/14/2013


Call them especially despicable Olympians. Justice has finally caught up with Fernando Martin Vicente, the Spanish sports official who sent a team stocked with nondisabled athletes to win the gold medal in intellectually disabled basketball at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics. Team member Carlos Ribagorda copped to the scam shortly after the conclusion of the Games, saying at least 15 Spanish athletes had no physical or mental handicap, including 10 of the 12 on the basketball team. During one blowout win, Ribagorda said his coach told players, "Move down a gear, or they’ll figure out you’re not disabled." Spanish athletes were asked to return their medals, but only this week was Vicente hit with $200,000 in fines and penalties by a Madrid court. Charges were dropped against 18 others athletes and officials.

via MSN

http://now.msn.com/fernando-martin-vicente-spanish-sports-official-sent-nondisabled-athletes-to-win-2000-paralympic-gold-medal-in-basketball

Comment

Comment

A year on from the Paralympics, people with disabilities still face prejudice and abuse

David Weir
British quadruple gold medal-winning Paralympian David Weir takes part in the London 2012 victory parade. Photograph: Dan Kitwood/Getty Images


When Don goes out, he faces frequent hostility. Despite living in a picture postcard part of the country, this man in his 40s, with autism and emphysema, finds himself increasingly shoved aside on the street because he moves too slowly. Recently parking in a blue badge space, he was confronted by a hate-filled thug who screamed about "bloody benefit scroungers" then followed him up the street shouting insults until he saw a police officer.

Few people with disabilities will be surprised. There are an estimated 200 similar cases a day in our supposedly civilised nation, while a study found eight in 10 of those with autism suffering harassment like Don. One speaker at a conference asked his audience of 300 disabled people if anyone had endured taunts and abuse; all but 10 put their hands up, although hardly any bothered to report the incidents. Then there are the most extreme cases: the blind lady punched to the ground, the man with learning disabilities set on fire, the teenager killed on his birthday. Bear these incidents in mind if you hear hype about how the Paralympics changed Britain.
Tomorrow marks one year since the Paralympics, that glorious festival of sport, began. It ended with highfalutin speeches and proclamations of a seismic change in attitudes. We were told people would never see disability in the same way after witnessing the dazzling exploits of David Weir.
Read the full story at the Guardian 

Comment

Comment

British athletes seeking advantage from cutting-edge technology

By: Dan Roan 
22 August 2013 

Lutalo Muhammad is feeling ill.
"It's so life-like, I'm getting motion sickness," the European taekwondo champion and Olympic bronze medallist tells me as he tries to complete a flight-simulator challenge usually reserved for the world's best fighter pilots.
Muhammad has been granted access to a secretive bunker at BAE Systems' high-security factory in Warton, Lancashire. Final assembly of Eurofighter Typhoons takes place here and they are also building a multi-billion pound fleet of aircraft for the Royal Saudi Air Force.
It may all seem a far cry from the Korean martial art in which Muhammad excels but, as part of a newly extended partnership between UK Sport and the military defence giant, Warton's aerospace engineers may just hold the key to improving Britain's taekwondo prospects after the team'sdisappointing performance at the recent World Championships in Mexico.
Read the full article at BBC UK

Play m

Comment

Comment

Chuck Aoki: Does ‘inspire’ connote heroic or pitiable?



American wheelchair rugby player Chuck Aoki says it’s time for athletes to act upon the IPC’s core value of “inspiration.”
Chuck AokiChuck Aoki © • Getty Images
By Chuck Aoki

“You're so inspiring ... You are amazing, I'm just really inspired by what you do ... I'm just so inspired by you.”
These are words we have all heard as Paralympic athletes, and most people in wheelchairs have as well.
And for most of my life, I have hated being called “inspiring.”
Being inspirational felt like it was something that should be reserved for children, or people in hopeless situations, who fight on regardless. I haven't considered myself to be in either of these categories, at least not since I've been above the age of 15.
As such, I always took offense to being told I was “inspirational” by anyone, because it felt like this inspiration came out of pity toward me. And no one wants to be pitied, least of all Paralympic athletes.
But as I get older, I start to think more about being “inspiring” to people, and I've started to wonder, is it really such a bad thing to be inspiring?
I didn't set out to be inspiring when I began playing wheelchair rugby. My goal was to become the best I could be at it, and I've done fairly well at that.
I've faced a lot of unique challenges to get to this point, but never given up, despite how easily I could have. All Paralympic athletes have. For that matter all people with an impairment who stay active have.
Read more at Paralympic 

Comment

Comment

Olympics legacy: The Paralympics changed the way disability is perceived in Britain. But did they make a lasting difference?





TOM PECK  WEDNESDAY 17 JULY 2013


The most obvious legacy of London 2012 is the ubiquity of the word itself. But it is a word the Paralympic half of the Greatest Show on Earth was never keen on. “We prefer to talk about momentum rather than legacy,” said Tim Hollingsworth, the head of the British Paralympic Association. “Legacy suggests you’ve already achieved your aims. For us, this last year has been about capturing the momentum the Paralympics put in motion.”


“London provided this fantastic platform, but it was the starting point. Now we’re at the foot of the mountain. We know where we’re going, but we’re at the foot of the mountain.”

The British Paralympic Association’s job is to deliver the gold, which it did. Many of the most magical moments of that summer came long after Usain Bolt and Michael Phelps and the rest of the superstars had left Stratford. Three Paralympic athletes made it on the BBC’s Sports Personality of the Year shortlist.

Read more at the  Independent 

Comment

Comment

Tom Tagholm’s Paralympic Promo Introduces the Superhumans in Defiant Style


08.26.12 


I’m not generally a fan of sport and view the majority of advertising through a cynical gaze. All that was blown away in the face of Tom Tagholm’s Meet the Superhumans promo for Channel 4′s coming Paralympic Games coverage — which got my heart racing like I’d just finished the 100 metres. Tagholm’s use of Public Enemy’s Harder Than You Think strikes exactly the right defiant tone that what’s to come is going to be some of the most amazing physical and mental achievements humankind has ever seen.
Despite being a project commissioned by Channel 4 for such a high profile event, the production still faced its share of challenges in terms of access and the technicalities of capturing some of the spot’s most iconic shots:
We filmed at a lot of Paralympic test events which was very tricky in terms of access and how close we could get to the competitors and what sort of camera angles we could find that were new and felt special. It was a case of all the camera operators and myself keeping our eyes open at all times because there were people that we found and moments that we saw that we could have never predicted.
There’s also another slow mo shot of two wheelchair rugby chairs crashing crash in to each other. We were shooting that on Phantom cameras and knew that we had to get right in to the middle of the crash, which meant some really careful choreography and great set design. It was a really tricky balance trying to get that feeling of absolute naturalism whilst at the same time trying to get right in the heart of the action.

Comment