Viewing entries in
"parents"

Comment

Parenting A Deaf Child


Finding Out

My husband and I found out that our youngest son was deaf when he was around 3 months old. This news came after he spent a month in theNICU fighting for his life. He had passed the newborn hearing test that was given prior to him leaving the hospital, so when we were told the news, the shock was almost overwhelming.
The first thing that lead us to be concerned was the fact that our son would not turn his head to loud noises. He wouldn't get startled by the barking dog or a large truck that would go by the house. Babies have a natural reflex when they are startled. He never got startled. People could in and out of the door, there could be a lot of commotion, but the noises never seemed to bother him. Even his older brother running and hollering around the house didn't phase him.
At his 3 month check-up we brought our concerns to the doctor. At the time, we didn't actually believe that he was deaf but we felt that something was not quite right. The doctor set up a hearing test with the audiology department at the hospital. We went to the test and after, the doctor met with us to give us the news: Our son had profound bilateral sensorineural hearing loss. That meant that he had profound hearing loss in both ears. The damage was permanent and hearing aids may or may not help...
Read the full article at Christinascibona 
(http://christinascibona.hubpages.com/hub/Parenting-A-Deaf-Child)

Comment

Comment

When Mental Illness Leads To Divorce: What You Should Know

By 


Mental illness can both contribute to and become influenced by divorce.
The heartbreaking realities of divorce include the high split rate for people with mental illnesses. A multinational study of mental disorders, marriage and divorce published in 2011 found that a sample of 18 mental disorders all increased the likelihood of divorce — ranging from a 20-percent increase to an 80-percent increase in the divorce rate. Addictions and major depression were the highest factors, with PTSD (Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder) also significant.
Elsewhere, researchers have shown a strong link between personality disorders and elevated divorce rates, with antisocial personality disorder and histrionic personality disorder having the highest rates. The authors accepted that there was insufficient research on narcissistic personality disorder to quantify its effect on divorce, although anecdotal evidence strongly suggests a link. With the reported increase in narcissistic traits in the U.S., we are likely to see this as an increasing category.

Read the full article at Your Tango 

(http://www.yourtango.com/2013191101/when-mental-illness-leads-divorce-what-you-should-know?)

Comment

Comment

Students with Disabilities Preparing for Postsecondary Education:


.
Cover: Students with Disabilities Preparing for Postsecondary Education

U.S. Department of Education
Office for Civil Rights
Washington, D.C. 20202

September 2011
More and more high school students with disabilities are planning to continue their education in postsecondary schools, including vocational and career schools, two- and four- year colleges, and universities. As a student with a disability, you need to be well informed about your rights and responsibilities as well as the responsibilities postsecondary schools have toward you. Being well informed will help ensure you have a full opportunity to enjoy the benefits of the postsecondary education experience without confusion or delay.

The information in this pamphlet, provided by the Office for Civil Rights (OCR) in the U. S. Department of Education, explains the rights and responsibilities of students with disabilities who are preparing to attend postsecondary schools. This pamphlet also explains the obligations of a postsecondary school to provide academic adjustments, including auxiliary aids and services, to ensure the school does not discriminate on the basis of disability.

OCR enforces Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (Section 504) and Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (Title II), which prohibit discrimination on the basis of disability. Practically every school district and postsecondary school in the United States is subject to one or both of these laws, which have similar requirements.*/

Although Section 504 and Title II apply to both school districts and postsecondary schools, the responsibilities of postsecondary schools differ significantly from those of school districts.

Moreover, you will have responsibilities as a postsecondary student that you do not have as a high school student. OCR strongly encourages you to know your responsibilities and those of postsecondary schools under Section 504 and Title II. Doing so will improve your opportunity to succeed as you enter postsecondary education.

The following questions and answers provide more specific information to help you succeed.


Read more at ED.gov 

U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights, Students With Disabilities Preparing for Postsecondary Education: Know Your Rights and Responsibilities, Washington, D.C., 2011.

Comment

Comment

The Maternal Mental Health Rights Every PPD Mom Deserves


PPD Bill of RightsBy KATHERINE STONE
Recently, I shared here on Babble the myriad of problems that mothers face when it comes to beingscreened for postpartum depression. It’s not just screening that is inconsistent; it’s pretty much everything related to PPD.
If you go into a doctor’s or other healthcare provider’s office to talk about maternal mental health, you may or may not receive an official screening test, and if you do, it may be offered offhandedly and without compassion or information. You may be offered only one treatment option and you may be given very little information about it. You might feel as though you are not being heard or treated with respect. It may feel as though no one is able to spend much time with you or is interested in following up with you to make sure your treatment is effective and that you are recovering. You may even be given information that is completely incorrect about perinatal mood and anxiety disorders.
If so, you’re not alone. How do I know? I write the mostwidely read blog in the world on PPD and maternal mental illness, and I run a nonprofit that advocates for pregnant women and new moms with maternal mental illness. I talk to women from around the country and across the globe every day, and I know what’s happening to them. My belief is that, despite the fact that much progress has been made in the last couple of decades, we still have a long way to go, and it’s going to take the power of women uniting together and demanding more to get there.
Read more at Babble 

Comment

Comment

10 Reasons I’m Blessed to Be Raising My Two Kids with Down Syndrome

By ELIANA TARDIO

It has been more than 6 years since my daughter was born. Her unexpected diagnosis of Down syndrome kept me frozen and living with uncertainty for her first few weeks of life. I already had a child with Down syndrome, my 2 year-old son, and becoming the mother of two kids with Down syndrome really made me think of the future and my ability to take care of two kids with special needs.
In general she was a very healthy newborn. She was born two weeks before her due date (my water broke while I was running to catch my son in a pool party), but she was already a healthy 7 pounds and 19 inches long—pretty good weight and height for a baby with an extra chromosome. I delivered her after 12 hours of labor, with no epidural and no pain medicine. I always knew I wanted to be completely conscious when I first held her in my arms and welcomed her. I didn’t know if she would be born with Down syndrome, so I also wanted to look at her closely for any sign of condition. It turned out I didn’t need to, as her characteristics were very obvious and the nurse told me about her condition immediately after she was born.
The first thought that came to my mind was, “Oh my God. This cannot be happening to me again.” Suddenly I heard myself sobbing, but it was weird feeling. My mind was still processing but my body was already reacting to the biggest fear of my life: having a second child with Down syndrome.
Read the full list at Babble 

Comment

Comment

Parents—Know Your Rights



Watch the video below, featuring Dr. Mary Ann Block, author of No More ADHD
About ‘ADHD’ & Child Mental Disorders:
“Virtually anyone at any given time can meet the criteria for bipolar disorder or ADHD.  Anyone.  And the problem is everyone diagnosed with even one of these ‘illnesses’ triggers the pill dispenser.” — Dr. Stefan Kruszewski, Psychiatrist
Parents are quite simply not being given accurate information about psychiatric labels (mental disorders) or the drugs being prescribed to ‘treat’ their children.  This is fact: There are no medical tests in existence that can prove ADHD or any other  mental disorder is a physical abnormality, brain dysfunction, chemical imbalance or genetic abnormality. Period.  Even the National Institute of Health Consensus (NIH) issued a statement admitting, “We do not have an independent, valid test for ADHD, and there is no data to indicate that ADHD is due to a brain malfunction.”
Millions of children have been diagnosed with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), BiPolar disorder, OCDSocial Anxiety Disorder (SAD) and many other psychiatric labels (diagnosis) none of which are supported by medical test or confirmed as physical malfunctions (disease) by science.  Parents are simply told their child is mentally ill and more often than not, told to place their child on psychiatric drugs, including ADHD drugs which the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration categorizes in the same class of highly addictive substances as cocaine, morphine and opium. They are not being provided with non-harmful, non-drug solutions for problems of attention, mood or behavior.
Read the full article at CCHR International 

Comment

Comment

Autism-Friendly Performance: OKLAHOMA!


What is an Autism-Friendly Performance?

Autism-Friendly Performances are designed and intended for families with children on the autism spectrum or who have other sensory issues. At these performances the theater environment will be altered, providing a safe, sensory-friendly, comfortable and judgment-free space that is welcoming for these families. Autism-Friendly Performances are recommended for those families bringing a loved one have a developmental disability, and their teachers and advocates who are familiar with and accepting of behaviors exhibited by some individuals with autism.

FAQs

Q: Is this performance only for families of children with autism or other sensory issues, or can anyone attend?A: Autism-Friendly Performances are intended primarily for families with children on the autism spectrum or who have other sensory issues. In addition to altering the theater environment to cater to those with sensory issues, a main goal of this program is to provide a safe, judgment-free, comfortable experience for the entire family. We achieve this by recommending this performance for those families bringing loved ones who have a developmental disability, and their advocates who are familiar with and accepting of behaviors exhibited by some children with autism.
Read the full article at Boston Conservatory where showtimes, ticket pricing and full synopsis can be found. 

Comment

Comment

When should we question if our child is getting the right treatment?


Comment

1 Comment

Coping with the News that Your Child has Special Needs


Receiving the News

I remember very clearly the day our pediatrician told me and my husband about our daughter's disability. She had been born eleven weeks premature, and we knew she had suffered some brain damage during the emergency c-section, but despite those facts, we still hoped for the best. At six months old, we knew she was behind developmentally, but we thought it was because of her prematurity. At the doctor's office, however, we found out differently. He told us it looked like she had symptoms of cerebral palsy and that the best thing for her would be to get involved in occupational and physical therapy right away. My husband sat there, stunned. I held my sleeping daughter in my arms with one question racing through my mind. I had to ask, "Does this mean she could be in a wheelchair the rest of her life?"
When he answered, I began to cry and the doctor came over and hugged me and my daughter.
That was nearly five years ago. I did not cope very well with the news. I felt a myriad of emotions - sadness, guilt, overwhelmed, anxious, scared - all of which led me into a state of depression. If I had known then what I know now, I probably would have had an easier time dealing with this news. That's why I'd like to share.

Acceptance

Acceptance of your child's special needs can be very difficult. Every parent wants their child to be healthy and whole. "As long as my baby's healthy" is often what parents say when asked if they want a boy or a girl. When it turns out the baby is not healthy, it can be very traumatic.
The most helpful thing to accept what is going on with your son or daughter is to grieve what your child may never be. One of the things I had to grieve was that I might never be able to see my daughter take her first steps. A parent of an autistic child may have to grieve the loss of their child ever having an in-depth conversation. Depending on the child's disability, the grieving will be different for each case.
During the grieving process, remember that is okay to cry and to feel sad. It's important to feel these feelings instead of trying to stuff them down deep inside, which could ultimately lead to depression, as it did with me. The important thing is to not stay stuck in these emotions.

Read the full article at Carl Jean 

1 Comment

Comment

Autism Moms Have Stress Similar To Combat Soldiers


By 
Mothers of adolescents and adults with autism experience chronic stress comparable to combat soldiers and struggle with frequent fatigue and work interruptions, new research finds. These moms also spend significantly more time caregiving than moms of those without disabilities.
Researchers followed a group of moms of adolescents and adults with autism for eight days in a row. Moms were interviewed at the end of each day about their experiences and on four of the days researchers measured the moms’ hormone levels to assess their stress.
They found that a hormone associated with stress was extremely low, consistent with people experiencing chronic stress such as soldiers in combat, the researchers report in one of two studies published in the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders.
Read the full story at Disability Scoop 

Comment

Comment

The ‘invisible disability’ that is Tourette’s: one family’s story


The Globe and Mail

Last week, nearly 9,000 Twitter users came down with temporary Tourette syndrome.
As part of a campaign called Surrender Your Say, people opted to relinquish control of their Twitter accounts for 24 hours to raise awareness about the disorder. Participants could tweet as normal, but occasionally a bot – based on the real tics of a person with the disorder – would tweet out unexpected messages such as “Feet, don’t feet” or “Ah! Ah! Ah! Ummmmmm.”
Melissa Muskat, a lawyer with Goodmans in Toronto, was one of the people impacted by the disorder who watched the campaign by ad agency Saatchi & Saatchi Toronto for the Tourette Syndrome Foundation of Canada. As the mother of a son with Tourette syndrome, she was pleased to see the innovative use of social media to inform people that the disorder is more complex than the popular notion of a disease that causes people to swear uncontrollably (a condition that actually affects less than one in 10 people with TS).
Read more at the Globe and Mail

Comment

Comment

Disability Awareness: 10 Things Parents Should Teach Their Kids About Disabilities


Parents are all over the board when it comes to how they teach their kids about disabilities. Some scold their kids when they ask what’s wrong when a person with a disability passes by, and other parents are totally cool with letting their kids run around and approach us at will. No two parenting techniques are alike.
But there are a few things that are repeated. From telling their child to always look away or giving them a generic viewpoint of people with disabilities, mistakes on how to talk about us are abound. Since even the most well-meaning parent can accidentally flub up, here are 10 ways to help give your kid a leg up on how to think differently about disabilities.
1) Answering “Why can’t they walk?”
One of the most common questions kids ask when they see someone who uses a wheelchair is this, “Why can’t they walk?” Kids are naturally curious and have no filter, which are without question one of their best and worst qualities. If your child is younger, saying, “They just have an owie,” can be enough.
If they’re older however, just be honest. “I don’t know, baby, but most likely it’s because their nerves,” is all you need to say. My 6-year-old niece is a great example. She’s still too young to understand the concept of a spinal cord injury, so I just tell her my legs just don’t listen to me anymore, and she understand it completely.
But what’s great is once they fully understand, fear is erased.

Read more at Huffington Post 

Comment

Comment

Dad’s of Disability: A Worthwhile Project



30 July 2013 by 
Social work and some of its core principles i.e. social justice and advocacy are close to my heart. SJS appreciates when an individual in the community approaches us regarding an idea or issue that clearly meshes with these values. The interview below is with such an individual, Gary Dietz, who wants to further educate society about father’s experiences with their children who experience disabilities. His project has a unique approach in that it will be a book with a collection of personal essays and poems all about the male caregiver’s perspective.
Why you have chosen to write this book and why the focus specifically on fathers?
I am a father of a 13 year old boy who has an interstitial deletion of the lower arm of chromosome 13. That means that some of his genetic material is missing between some of his other chromosomes. There’s no fancy name for this deletion like there are for more common rare genetic issues. Read that again, it is indeed what I meant — some rare genetic issues are more common than others and the ones that are ultra-uncommon don’t usually have names.

Comment

Comment

Growing pains of a disabled parent

By Disability Now 


Sleepless nights, the terrible twos, sibling rivalry, grumpy teenagers – it’s not surprising that parenting is said to be one of the hardest jobs in the world. Add being a disabled parent and having a disabled child into the equation and it's more complex, says Emma Bowler.
I have a rare disability called Kniest Syndrome which means I’m 4ft tall and don’t have the best mobility. I have two sons – Archie, aged eight, who also has Kniest and Ben, aged six, who doesn’t.
My initial parenting challenges were very practical – how would I get a baby in and out of a cot or highchair, bath him, or even get him from a to b?
I’m lucky to have a husband who is very handy: he adapted cots and scooters, and we found suitable products and tips via the internet, which has meant that I’ve always been a very hands-on parent.
But now both children are more independent and the practical challenges are being replaced with challenges that are more about meeting Archie’s social, emotional and medical needs. And finding a solution to these sorts of challenges is not quite so black and white.
Read more at Disability Now 

Comment

Comment

A Life Lesson About People With Disabilities For Parents Everywhere



keep-calm-its-only-a-wheelchair
Posted on:  

Since becoming a quadriplegic three years ago, I have quickly learned that people don’t know a whole lot about the disability community. When you’re uneducated about something, I think it’s normal to feel uncomfortable with it. Maybe even afraid of it.
While out in public I often get stares. People will even avoid the isle I’m in at a store and quite often jump out of my way as if I’d run them over. Keep calm. It’s only a wheelchair!
Wheelchair users don’t exactly have the luxury of blending in when they want to. Sometimes I wish I could, but when I’m out and about I personally try and make an effort to smile and wave when I roll by a child. Giving a child a good experience may ultimately make them more understanding and comfortable. The problem is though that some parents don’t know how to react to their child’s curiosity.
Here are few insights about how you can desensitize your child around people with disabilities.
Read more at the Mobility Resource 

Comment

Comment

Disability awareness day: Mrunal’s story

In his blog Mrunal shares the highs and lows of his life with his son Arun, who has cerebral palsy and autism, his younger daughter Meri, the mischief maker and last but no means least, his wife Clare.
This Sunday 14th July is Disability Awareness Day. So we at DAD would like to share with you some of the highlights from one of our bloggers.
Here are a few excerpts from his blogs over the last 2 years that he has been writing for DAD.
Fatherhood in intensive care.
My twin boys were born very prematurely at 24 weeks of gestation. Arun spent six months in hospital before coming home. Rohan never made it home, he died after nine weeks.
When the boys were in hospital, I spent a lot of time there. More than this, I spent as much time as I could there. In between working and eating, I think I spent pretty much every waking moment there.
This made me think about the levels of engagement that different men had shown in the plight of their children and got me thinking: Why were some Dads just not there?
Some men had demanding jobs where their employer was less sympathetic than my own and so simply could not spend hours at the hospital. Others may have been there in the hours that I was not. Other fathers undoubtedly had other children to look after whilst mother was tending to baby in hospital. Even so, I found it difficult to understand why they did not swap places sometimes.
Beyond these, I think, there are more deep seated psychological reasons why some men were absent. Mothers and babies bond instinctively. Fathers, however, need to work on getting to know their babies and some of them need to learn to love them. However, I suspect that some fathers just didn’t want to hang around the hospital and cluck over their child.
From my own experience there are two more sinister reasons why men were sometimes absent.
To put it simply, the first reason was that we were scared. An intensive care unit is a frightening place. There were numerous times when a small part of me wanted to be somewhere else, anywhere else where I did not have to face the stark reality of what was happening to my children.
Even darker though is the shame that I suspect some fathers felt at having a child in intensive care. Men are supposed to be strong. Our job is to further our genes by fathering strong children. To my own shame, there was one fleeting moment when I realised that a part of me had not completely accepted the children as my own. It only was when I saw my own name against the incubators that I truly felt ownership of the twins. It was only then that the tiny sliver of denial was exposed and finally expunged. I imagine that I was not alone in feeling this.
I can’t and I won’t judge those who were not present. I can only speculate as to why some fathers chose to be absent when their children were in hospital. Men, despite the press to the contrary, are complex creatures. Every father who chose to be there had their reasons and had to battle their own demons. I suspect every father that was absent had to do the same.
Read the full story at DAD

Comment

Comment

"Do you mind me asking what is wrong with him?" Yes, I do.


"Do you mind me asking what is wrong with him?" Yes, I do.
By COURTNEY DAWSON   Sunday 30 June 2013
I am the mother of a fantastic eight-year-old boy who is severely disabled. He has Autism, developmental delay, Cortical Vision Impairment, hearing loss and he is still learning to walk. He has no communication, he cannot feed himself and is still in nappies.
Last week I read the story about Miles Ambridge’s class photo(Mile Ambridge was a little boy in the US who was excluded from him class photo because was in a wheelchair) and it reduced me to tears.
schoolphotoapart1 380x213 Do you mind me asking what is wrong with him? Yes, I do.
I read it while watching Masterchef with my child’s Behaviour Support Worker (we are on a huge and exhausting eight-week journey to get kiddo to sleep in his bed all night) and I felt the tears burn in my eyes.
When I was alone, I cried. I am still crying. Not because of the outrage or blame or any of that, but because this story about a child with a disability was such real talk, real life – this is happening.
owen1 Do you mind me asking what is wrong with him? Yes, I do.
This is Courtney’s darling son Owen.
I felt really stupid that my son’s school photos came home on Friday and I was mad that he wasn’t wearing his adorable sweater in them. He was sitting in a row with his fellow special needs classmates, being adorable (as they all were, good looking little dudes!) and it never even occurred to me that he wouldn’t be included, ever. Owen attends an incredible special needs school in our area and I have never seen anyone excluded in a school photo. Or in any school activity.
Not every child with a disability has access to a special needs school, nor may their parents want to place their child there, but I wouldn’t have it any other way. At his school, the only way he is different is in his personality, likes and dislikes – just like any kid at any school – because all kids are different.

Comment

Comment

Parents create housing alternative for disabled adult children


Parents create housing alternative for disabled 

adult children




January 23, 2013|By Bonnie Miller Rubin, Chicago Tribune reporter


Baruch and Joyce Schur were out of options. They couldn't find anywhere for their physically and intellectually disabled 26-year-old son to live, at least nowhere that met their criteria or didn't have a yearslong waiting list.
The 55-year-old couple made plans to move out of the state. Uprooting themselves from their native Chicago, leaving friends and a family business, was the only way to give Josh a home — not an institution — that offered independence, a kosher kitchen and a sense of community before his parents became too elderly to care for him.
But then the Schurs took an even bolder step. They joined forces with five other families in similar circumstances to do what government could not: They created something better.
They become a nonprofit, raised their own money, bought their own property, hired a design team and a social services agency to staff a home. This month, six young men — with cerebral palsy, autism and Down syndrome — moved into a red brick Georgian on a lush block in the same Rogers Park neighborhood where they grew up.

Other parent-empowered groups are also rolling up their sleeves, joining this quiet crusade. A Glenview couple is working with Rush University Medical Center to construct housing for young adults with autism in the West Loop. In Wheaton, another family group collaborated with their church for a similar project.


In a previous era, children such as Josh Schur would have been institutionalized, their parents told to leave them in the hospital and forget about them. Today, because of medical advances and sweeping public policy changes, children with disabilities are not just surviving but thriving into adulthood. And no one knows what to do with them all.

There are 1 million to 1.5 million Americans with autism alone, 80 percent of whom are under the age of 22, according to the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In Illinois, about 22,500 people with disabilities are waiting for services, the Department of Human Services reports.
"The statistics are frightening," said Tony Paulauski of the Arc of Illinois, an advocacy organization. "What's going to happen to all these folks? We are bracing ourselves for a demographic wave ... and we are totally unprepared."
These young adults were born into a very different world than earlier generations. Parents started seeing their offspring for what they could do — not just what they couldn't.
They pushed clinicians for more physical, occupational and speech therapy and lawmakers toward mainstreaming policies. No longer hidden away, these youngsters were now woven into society, participating in school plays, soccer and Boy Scouts.

Then, at age 22, most publicly funded services end. As the kids get older, the journey gets lonelier. Some 80 percent of young adults with autism ages 19 to 30 still live at home, according to a 2008 Easter Seals study.


"People see how futile the situation is," Paulauski said. "And as government continues to shrink, it becomes even more important that families look at other sustainable models."

Read the whole story at Chicago Tribune

Comment

Comment

A mother helps son in his struggle with schizophrenia



By May 25 2013 



HOUSTON — The mother drives her son everywhere because he is not well enough to drive. He sits next to her, and at the red lights she looks over and studies him: how quiet he is, how stiffly he sits, hands in his lap, fingers fidgeting slightly, a tic that occasionally blooms into a full fluttering motion he makes with his hand, as if clearing invisible webs from his face. He is 19 years old, 6 feet tall, 250 pounds. His eyes are more steady than bright at this particular moment; his mouth is not set in a smile or a frown but some line in between.
“How’re you doing, sweetie?” Naomi Haskell asks.
“Fine,” Spencer says.

It has been 10 years since he began thinking his classmates were whispering about him, four years since he started feeling angry all the time, and two years since he first told a doctor he was hearing imaginary voices. It has been 20 months since he was told he had a form of schizophrenia, and 15 months since he swallowed three bottles of Benadryl and laid down to die, after which he had gotten better, and worse and, for a while, better again, or so Naomi had thought until an hour ago, when they were in the therapist’s office and Spencer said that his head was feeling “cloudy.”
“Wait —” she said, interrupting. “You described it as a cloudy feeling?”
Cloudy was the big, flying red flag that she had learned to dread. It might simply be a side effect of one of his five medications. But it could also be the quiet beginning of her firstborn son falling apart again, of hallucinations, or a dive into depression, or some other dimension of his illness that Naomi has yet to fathom.
“Yeah,” Spencer said. “Cloudy. It feels like these winds are blowing inside my head.”
A light turns red, and she glances over again.
“You’re feeling okay, baby?” she asks.
“Yeah,” he says, staring straight ahead.
This is what it is like to be the mother of a son with a severe mental illness — an hour-to-hour, minute-to-minute vigil. At a time of increasing public concern about the role mental illness might have played in mass shootings in places like Newtown, Conn., and Aurora, Colo., Naomi’s worry on a Tuesday in Texas is different. It’s about keeping her son well.
“Dear Friends and Family . . .” she had written last year, explaining her son’s illness and his suicide attempt. “I don’t believe I have fully processed the horror of my child suffering a level of torment so deep that it caused him to want to end his life. I’m afraid of what will happen to me if I think about it too much.”
So what Naomi is thinking about now is helping Spencer make it until Friday, when he has another therapy appointment, and when the effect of a new medication he has just started taking might become clear.


Comment