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10 Things The Media Should Stop Doing When Discussing Disabilities

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The media loves to think they know everything. They love being in on the latest “it” thing, acting like they’re hip and can relate to the people. However, they never seem to care about stepping it up when it comes to referring to people with disabilities in the most appropriate way.
The written and spoken word is constantly evolving too. The media knows when to use “twerk” and “tweet,” but would it kill them to stop saying “wheelchair-bound?”
If the way the media discusses disabilities makes you cringe, read on for the top ten things the media should stop doing when discussing disabilities.
1) Stop saying “wheelchair-bound.”
A term nearly as old as the wheelchair itself, the term “wheelchair-bound” needs to be left in the antique store with its wooden wheelchair-counterpart. Seriously, who says this anymore? Saying “Tiffiny is wheelchair-bound” is absolutely the wrong way to refer to someone who uses a wheelchair, yet the media does it all the time.
We are not bound by our wheelchairs. How can we be “bound” by something that makes us so independent? If anything, it should be more like “the chair is human-bounded” rather than the “person is wheelchair-bound.” We overtake the wheelchair and make it our own. I even think some of us would even put nano-technology into our bodies if it was possible. What should they say instead? Look for the answer below.
Read the full article at the Mobility Resource 
(http://www.themobilityresource.com/10-things-mainstream-media-should-stop-doing-when-discussing-disabilities/)

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10 THINGS YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT PEOPLE WHO HAVE AUTISM


1. NEVER under-estimate an individual because they are on the spectrum. Some of the most intelligent, interesting, and most capable people I know have Autism. 
2. Don’t assume that people with autism are emotionless or uncaring if they don’t respond in a way you would expect others to respond. Often times people on the spectrum have a harder time displaying and sorting their feelings and emotions. Sometimes they see things so black and white that they may not see your side.
View the full list at Rockin Moms World 
(http://rockinmomsworld.com/2013/11/05/10-things-you-need-to-know-about-people-who-have-autism/)

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True or False? The Top 10 Myths About Bipolar Disorder


Expert Patient John McManamy gives you the real story.

Like many mental illnesses, the commentary surrounding bipolar disorder is saturated with myths--it's hard to tell what's true and what's not. Below you'll find the real story, from our Expert Patient John McManamy.
1. Everyone has their ups and downs, so mine aren’t that serious.
Yes, everyone has good days and bad days, but when these ups and downs seriously interfere with your ability to work, relate to others and function effectively, it is advisable to seek out a psychiatrist.
2. Bipolar disorder is a mood disorder.
Half true. Bipolar disorder certainly affects mood, but it also affects cognition and the ability to perform mental tasks. Some days we can out-think Stephen Hawking. Other days we make Forrest Gump look like an intellectual.
3. Yes, but bipolar disorder is still a mood disorder.
Granted, but for most of us it is also part of a package deal that may include anxiety, substance and alcohol abuse and sleep disorders. Also, researchers are finding smoking guns linking the illness to heart disease, migraines and other physical ailments.
Read the full article at Health Central 
(http://www.healthcentral.com/bipolar/just-diagnosed-779-143.html?ap=2008)

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6 Surprising Signs of an Unhealthy Heart


by Melanie Haiken, Caring.comNovember 14, 2013
We’ve all read the signs of a heart attack listed on posters in the hospital waiting room. But what if there were other, earlier signs that could alert you ahead of time that your heart was in trouble?
It turns out there are. Researchers have done a lot of work in recent years looking at the signs and symptoms patients experienced in the months or even years leading up to a heart attack. “The heart, together with the arteries that feed it, is one big muscle, and when it starts to fail the symptoms can show up in many parts of the body,” says cardiologist Jonathan Goldstein of Saint Michael’s Medical Center in Newark, New Jersey. Here are seven surprising clues that your heart needs a check. Any of these signs — and particularly two or more together — should send you to the doctor for tests.

Sexual problems

Something cardiologists know but the average guy doesn’t: Erectile dysfunction (ED) is one of the best early tip-offs to progressive heart disease. “Today, any patient who comes in with ED should be considered a cardiovascular patient until proven otherwise,” says Goldstein. In women, reduced blood flow to the genital area can impede arousal, make it harder to reach orgasm, or make orgasms less satisfying.
Scary stat: Researchers at the Mayo clinic followed men ages 40-49 with erectile dysfunction and found they were twice as likely to develop heart disease as those with no sexual health problems. Another study looked backward and found that two out of three men being treated for cardiovascular disease had suffered from erectile dysfunction, often for years, before they were diagnosed with heart trouble.
Why it happens: Narrowing and hardening of the arteries restricts blood flow to the penis, which can give men trouble when it comes to getting or keeping an erection. And because those arteries are smaller than the ones leading to the heart, erectile dysfunction can occur before any other sign of artery stiffness. Lack of oxygen can also lead to ongoing fatigue and weakness, which can sabotage libido, so lack of desire may accompany lack of success.
What to do: If you or your partner has difficulty getting or maintaining an erection or has problems with sexual satisfaction, that’s reason enough to visit your doctor to investigate cardiovascular disease as an underlying cause. Get a full workup to assess possible causes of erectile dysfunction or difficulty with orgasm. (Guys, see your GP, not just a urologist; gals, don’t just see an ob/gyn.) If your doctor doesn’t mention heart tests, request them.
Read the full article at Banoosh
(http://banoosh.com/blog/2013/11/14/6-surprising-signs-of-an-unhealthy-heart/)

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Top Five Marijuana Strains For PMS

Posted by  at 8:47 AM on November 15, 2013

There’s a serious lack of information around how cannabis can help female-specific health issues. It’s interesting to see how much research is out around issues like PTSD and other forms of anxiety, yet the health issues that disproportionately affect women are rarely talked about. This isn’t to say that women don’t also suffer from these issues, but things like premenstrual syndrome (PMS or PMDD) or menopause are hardly mentioned in relation to cannabis. Why is this? Possibly because the cannabis industry is almost always synonymous with bro-culture, pandering to twenty-something male stoners. I don’t think this trend was necessarily intentional, but gender-based bias within the cannabis industry has been largely overlooked, like most other male-dominated industries.
Due to unexamined sexism within the cannabis industry, research around female- specific health issues like PMS is still widely unknown. It’s much more common to figure out what a patient needs off the basis of the male body, leaving “lady” aliments in isolation. This whole problem pissed me off, so I decided to compile a small list of strains that have been known to help PMS from Brightside Community Foundation-the non-profit medical marijuana dispensary I work at. Many women are unaware of the benefits that cannabis can provide their health issues. As a woman pioneering her way through the cannabis industry, I want to begin to start providing that information in order to address the needs of women that are all too often left out of the conversation.
Read the full article at the Weed Blog 
(http://www.theweedblog.com/top-five-marijuana-strains-for-pms/)

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3 Things You Should Never Do When Communicating with the Hearing Impaired



I’ve lived with hearing loss for close to 15 years.  In that time, I’ve had a lot of interesting interactions with folks who learn about my disability. Here are three things that you shouldn’t do to a deaf or hard-of-hearing (HOH) individual.

Shout.  Just because someone has difficulty hearing, does not mean it justifies shouting. Do you want to speak a little louder, slower and clearer than when you interact with others? Yes.  But there is no need to shout.  Clearly communicate what you want to say and be sure to make eye contact with them.

Read the full article at Xpressive Handz

(http://xpressivehandz.blogspot.com/2013/11/3-things-you-should-never-do-when.html?spref=fb)

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6 More Ways to Manage Clinical Depression

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6 More Ways to Manage Clinical Depression
In a prior blog post, I listed seven ways to manage severe, clinicaldepression when you can’t get out of bed.

The suggestions are different than the popular tips most depression experts give for boosting your mood, which are usually written for those with mild or moderate depression — or the really lucky people who just want to feel better.

I thought it would be helpful to expand my list and give you six more ways to manage severe depression.

1. Remember your heroes.
When making it to the breakfast table is a humble feat, it helps to remember I’m in good company with depressives past and present: Abraham Lincoln, Winston Churchill, Kay Redfield Jamison, Mike Wallace, William Styron, Art Buchwald, Robin Williams, Patty Duke, and Brooke Shields. They struggled with death thoughts, too, but they survived … and succeeded at so many things. They are missionaries of truth and perseverance.

Abraham Lincoln wanted people to know that his melancholy was a “misfortune, not a fault,” and that his humor, his jokes, were the “vents of [his] moods and gloom.” British Prime Minster Winston Churchill referred to his deep melancholy as his “black dog.” It was his teacher of perseverance. Kay Redfield Jamison reminded folks that “tumultuousness, if coupled with discipline and a cool mind, is not such a bad sort of thing.” Without Lincoln, Churchill, Jamison, and the others, I’d think I really was going crazy and stand crippled, terrified in my darkness...


http://psychcentral.com/blog/archives/2013/09/14/6-more-ways-to-manage-clinical-depression/

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8 Fallacies About Suicide

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To mark Suicide Prevention Week, support groups and non-profit organizations from all over 
the world are educating the public about the realities of suicide, while reaching out to help people
 struggling with mental health conditions such as clinical depression and bipolar disorder.

To educate and enlighten my fellow Filipinos, I’d like to present to you the 8 biggest fallacies about 
suicide. May this stop the stigma and allow us to help a loved one who may be suffering in silence 
with the highly misunderstood disease called depression.

8
FALLACY: People who talk about suicide are just weak, dramatic and KSP (kulang sa pansin).
REALITY: Suicide can strike any gender, race, age, financial status, and type of personality. Even the most intelligent, spiritual, and strong-willed people can get suicidal. “Instead of ostracizing them, what they actually need is compassion and empathy,” said psychiatrist Dr. Rene Samaniego of Makati Medical Center. “They are in pain and often times reach out for help because they do not know what to do and have lost hope,” explained Kevin Caruso, founder of suicide.org, which promotes suicide prevention, awareness, and support. “Always take talk about suicide seriously. Always.”
 
FacebookStatistic


7
FALLACY: You shouldn’t talk about suicide with anyone, especially the suicidal ones, because it could give them the idea.
REALITY: “It is important to talk about suicide with people who are suicidal because you will learn more about their mindset and intentions, and allow them to diffuse some of the tension that is causing their suicidal feelings,” said Caruso.
7V
http://8list.ph/suicide-myths/

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15 Sign Language Interpreters Going Ham At Concerts! Can You Hand-le It?

We all lost our minds for Lydia Callis last year when she delivered animated sign language interpretations for New York City’s Mayor Bloomberg during super-storm Sandy. When it comes to actual entertainment, however, it makes sense that concert sign language interpreters would really give it their all too.
A hearing impaired concert-goer is of course present to see their favorite artists perform, but they’re also spending a good portion of their time watching and being entertained by the person signing. They may not be able to listen to music in the same way that other folks can, but between the vibrations from the bass and a good sign language interpreter, concerts can still be highly enjoyable. Here’s a look at the people who really COMMIT when they interpret an artist’s lyrics, and in some cases, even provide some funky dance moves.
CONCERT: Kendrick Lamar
Confidently evoking Kendrick’s swag during “F—in’ Problems,” the enthusiasm from this interpreter is top notch!


http://www.vh1.com/music/tuner/2013-09-15/kick-ass-sign-language-interpreters/

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24 Things Only Dyslexic People Will Understand

by 

1. Your brain has the magical power to make letters dance around like drunk idiots.

24 Things Only Dyslexic People Will Understand
WORST SUPERPOWER EVER.

2. It can sometimes take you a second to figure out what something really says.

It can sometimes take you a second to figure out what something really says.

3. But all those extra seconds add up, and you feel like the slowest reader of all time.

But all those extra seconds add up, and you feel like the slowest reader of all time.
Via imgur.com

4. People tell you to “just keep practicing,” as though practicing can you make you something that you’re not.

People tell you to "just keep practicing," as though practicing can you make you something that you're not.

5. You’re very confused when people assume you’re just stupid…

 
If the letters want to be read so quickly, maybe they shouldn’t wander around so much.

View full list via Buzzfeed

http://www.buzzfeed.com/kristinchirico/things-only-dyslexic-people-will-understand

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27 Things You’ll Only Know If You’re A Wheelchair User

by 

1. You’ll always be the first to know if someone’s fly is undone.

You'll always be the first to know if someone's fly is undone.
Do us a favour and keep the peep show zipped up.

2. Your dance moves aren’t traditional but they still work.

27 Things You'll Only Know If You're A Wheelchair User
And, damn, they look good.

3. You know each and every crack or pothole on pavements and walkways.

27 Things You'll Only Know If You're A Wheelchair User
Broken pavements, cracks in the path, no slope down from the path to the road… Your hawk-eye view of the ground doesn’t miss a beat.

4. Cobblestones are proof that hell is a place on earth.

Cobblestones are proof that hell is a place on earth.
That goes for the girls in their stilettos too.

5. When a new road or path is laid down, the thrill of bump-free wheeling is overwhelming.

27 Things You'll Only Know If You're A Wheelchair User
It is heavenly.
http://www.buzzfeed.com/louisebruton/things-youll-know-if-youre-a-wheelchair-user

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5 Things a Caregiver Should Know

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There is a lot of information out there about how to be a cancer patient. Drink this. Inject that. Have this surgery. Stay away from these.
There's no guidebook giving instructions on how to be a caregiver. There are no physician consultations to tell you what the next step is in how to provide moral, physical, and emotional support to the person you love that has just been diagnosed with a possibly fatal disease. There are no rules about caring for yourself.
Having been a caregiver for nearly three years to my late husband, who was diagnosed at the age of 22 with stage III testicular cancer, I've been around the block. Here are five things I learned that I hope will help guide other caregivers in your heart-wrenching predicaments everywhere:
1. It's okay to freak out for yourself.
You're already freaking out for your loved one. That one comes naturally. What takes a little bit more consciousness and effort, is to allow yourself to lose it all, come totally unglued, fall apart... all over how this diagnosis is affecting you and your life. You're a person, too. Yes, with needs. Your world just got rocked and while you're busy holding it all together in support of your loved one, you forget how to let go and let your feelings matter, too. I'm here to tell you that it's not just okay to allow yourself to feel and experience the magnitude of what you're dealing with, it's something that I encourage you to do, for your own sake...
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/karen-sewell/caregiver-tips_b_3991691.html?utm_hp_ref=tw

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21 Awesome Things Living Life With Disabilities Can Do For You

by 

It's no secret that there's a collective perception in our society that being disabled is a bad thing. In a fair amount of people's minds, physical death would be a better alternative than having a disability would. Why? Because in their minds, facing the consequences of physical death would be much easier than facing the consequences of having a disability.
Who could blame anyone for thinking this way. Living life with disabilities can indeed be a very scary bitch!
Even though things have slowly improved for our segment of the population over the years, the world is still not completely designed with us or our needs in mind. Because of that, everything is harder for us. From living day to day, to taking care of ourselves, to "walking" around our neighborhood, to going to school, to getting a job to riding a bus or driving a car, to living on our own to having any kind of relationship whatsoever. Everything is harder if you have disabilities.
And then, there are the feelings that come along with living the disability life. Physical pain, frustration, anger, social prejudice, alienation, un-equality, un-acceptance and loneliness can be very hard to face. But, if one can conquer and move past these, 21 awesome things can happen. Read more about them below...
http://jparrottmerrell.hubpages.com/hub/benefits-of-living-life-with-a-disability

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10 Subtle Signs of Bipolar Disorder

By: Mr.H 

subtle-signs-of-bipolar-disorderWEB
Inability to complete tasks
Having a house full of half-completed projects is a hallmark of bipolar disorder. Those who can’t finish tasks often go from task to task, planning grand, unrealistic projects that are never finished before moving on to something else.
Depression
A person who is in a bipolar depressive state is going to present as very similar to someone who has depression, presenting the same problems with energy, appetite, sleep, and focus as others who have moderate depression....
http://banoosh.com/blog/2013/10/07/10-subtle-signs-of-bipolar-disorder/

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10 Of The Most Common ADA Violations That Need To Stop

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What NOT to Say to Someone in Chronic Pain

by Tracy Rydzy, MSW, LSW 

April 30, 2013

271/365 - Death Toll Rises to 100; Number of Displaced People Up To Over 450,000I will be the first to admit that living in chronic pain can make me a bit…sensitive.  I think when you live with pain or a disability, there is a tendency to think that people are judging you or criticizing you.  I often feel a sense of inferiority at not being able to do what women my age can do.  I also tend to feel there is a stigma attached to being chronically ill and, especially, to taking pain medication.

Through my discussions with fellow chronic pain sufferers and from my own experience, I have compiled a list of things that I am often told that people think are helpful, but for most of us, they are not.  I am cautious in how I state this because I know that most people mean well and really are trying to help.  I also know that after a couple of years living with this, many people feel they need to walk on eggshells with me.  I am sure no one wants their support system to feel that way, so here are some things I personally find less than helpful:
1-    “You just have to accept that this is God’s plan and have faith.”
This is one of the most difficult things for me to hear because it transfers my anger to my higher power and that is not healthy for my faith.  By telling me that I am living in pain is part of some master plan does not increase my faith, but rather harms it.  I know there is a reason for everything and everything happens for a reason, but when repeatedly told to “just have faith,” I feel angered because what I think many people do not realize is that I do have faith, if I didn’t, I couldn’t live with all the negative things in life and survive.

2-    “You just need to relax.”
My pain is not the result of being anxious or uptight.  I have tried yoga, meditation and weekly massages, but it doesn’t make my pain go away.  Loved ones need to recognize that living with chronic pain comes with anxieties.  But these anxieties are not the root of my pain, they are the byproduct of it.  Reminding me that I need to relax or calm down does not help me relax, it does the opposite.


http://blogs.psychcentral.com/chronic-pain/what-not-to-say-to-someone-in-chronic-pain/

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Mental Health Awareness Week: Top 10 Myths about Asian Americans and Mental Health

In 1990, Congress declared the first week of October to be Mental Health Awareness Week; today marks the final day of Mental Health Awareness Week 2013. In honour of this week, here are the top 10 myths about Asian Americans and mental health that remain pervasive in our community.

1. Mental health isn’t an Asian American issue.
In several studies that specifically examine the incidence of suicide among Asian Americans have found a far greater incidence among Asian Americans than many other ethnic groups. Most notably,Asian American women at multiple ages have higher suicide rates than the national average. In particular, both elderly Asian American women (>65) and men (>85) have the highest  suicide rates compared to non-Asians. Suicide is the 8th leading cause of death for Asian Americans, (compared to 11th for the national population). These data strongly suggest a specific and under-addressed disparity in mental health awareness and treatment in the Asian American community.

2. Depression and mental illness is rare in the Asian American community.
Few studies have specifically examined the incidence of depression in the Asian American community, and those that have show some conflicting results, but in analysis of the National Latino and Asian American Survey, depression-related symptoms is reported in approximately 10% of Asian Americans. 15.9% of young Asian American women report suicidal thoughts (which is comparable to the national average).

View full list via Reappropriate 

http://reappropriate.co/?p=3389

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10 Majorly Successful People With Disabilities

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Everyone has hardships they encounter in their lives, but when someone with a disability is able to overcome all of the additional c#$!% a disability brings to not only survive, but to find mega success, that is an amazing thing to behold.
It takes a lot of strength and a complete no-fear attitude to go as far as these highly successful people with disabilities have. From inventors and CEOs to performers and artists, here are of some of the biggest overcoming-disability-to-succeed success stories.
1) Stephen Hawking
Much more than the namesake of Into the Universe with Stephen Hawking (which is an awesome show on the Discovery channel by the way), Stephen Hawking is one of the most well-known physicists in the world, and he was able to achieve that in spite of being diagnosed with ALS when he was 21.
He can now only speak with the assistance of a computer and has been a fulltime powerchair-user since the 1980s. His disability however has never been an excuse to give up on his desire to study the universe, specifically the framework of general relativity and quantum mechanics. His best-selling work, A Brief History of Time, stayed on the Sunday Times bestsellers list for an astounding 237 weeks.
2) FDR
A beloved U.S. president who helped guide the nation successfully through World War II, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt is considered a great president and the entire time he was in office, FDR was also a wheelchair-user. Upon starting his political career in gusto, he contracted polio while drinking water at a campground and became paralyzed from the waist down.

Even though it wasn’t made public until years later that he couldn’t walk for fear of the public doubting his competency, FDR proved paralysis wasn’t a roadblock to being a great leader.
View Full List via Huffington Post 
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/10/22/famous-people-with-disabilities_n_4142930.html

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5 People Whose Major Disabilities Only Made Them Stronger


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Everyone loves stories about people who achieved fantastic things despite their disabilities; they make us feel better about the human race and, by extension, ourselves. Well, these stories aren't like that. These are about people who not only overcame their horrific disabilities, but did so in such balls-shatteringly unbelievable ways that they make the rest of us look like shit in the process. Prepare to feel completely worthless when compared to the awesomeness of ...

View list via Cracked 

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How to heal auto immune disease: 20 weird thyroid symptoms (for your comfort)


posted on october 15th, 2013
1. It can feel like depression… but not. “I wondered if I was depressed. But I wanted to work,” writes O’Rourke. “I didn’t feel apathy, only a weird sense that my mind and my body weren’t synched.” Shit! I get this. Let’s break it down…
2. Work is OK. The rest is hard. Of all the commitments in my life, working is the only one I can deal with when my thyroid folds. But only when I can shut out (oh, I hate that this is so…) people and other “complications”. It’s two things. First, in times of desperation (like when I have to do TV or speak to a group), adrenalin will kick in and dull AI symptoms. And I get through. Adrenalin trumps AI symptoms, but longterm this equation is a recipe for disaster as adrenalin acerbates AI.
Second, while AI causes brain fog, this can actually work to shut out distractions. With extra effort (which AI sufferers are good at), a singular focus can be kept. I’ve written before howpain and “fending” can make me really present.
(PS I’m writing this post in the midst of an AI flare. I’m hurting like hell. But I’m able to focus and write and get down and dirty with you all.)
View full list via Sarah Wilson 
http://www.sarahwilson.com.au/2013/10/how-to-heal-auto-immune-disease-20-weird-thyroid-symptoms-for-your-comfort/

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