July 24, 2013

Most of us know or know of someone with multiple sclerosis (MS), but how much do we really know about this illness? MS is an autoimmune disease that occurs when the body's immune system misfires against myelin, a fatty substance that insulates the nerve fibers of the brain, spinal cord, and optic nerves.
Approximately 400,000 people in the U.S. are living with MS, yet there are many misconceptions about the illness (and its prognosis).
Here we debunk the top 10 myths, and tell you what you can really expect if you, or someone you love, has been diagnosed with MS.

1. MS is a death sentence
The facts: MS is not a death sentence. Life expectancy is normal or close to normal for most people with MS.
It is a life sentence, however, meaning that there is no cure—although there are plenty of treatments to slow MS down and reduce symptoms.
"Many people with MS live full, active lives," says Nancy L. Sicotte, M.D., director of the Multiple Sclerosis Program at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. "We think of it as a chronic disease that can be managed, but there are a small percentage of people with severe MS who will die from complications."
Read the full article at ABC News





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