It's long been observed that many kids with autism have a hard time communicating and socializing with others. Now a new study using MRI scans provides some clues as to why.
Thanks to a weaker connection between the brain's language and reward centers, the human voice may provide little to no pleasure at all to kids with autism.

As they report this week in theProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers were able to spot "underconnectivity" using functional MRI, which tracks blood flow to look for brain activity.

Researchers scanned the brains of 20 children (average age: 10) with so-called "high-functioning autism" -- normal IQs but trouble hearing emotion in voices -- and 19 kids without autism but in the same age and IQ range. Not only did they find that those with autism exhibited weaker connections between the part of the brain that responds to the human voice and two regions associated with reward, but there was also a weaker link between the brain's voice processors and the amygdala, which involves emotion -- including the ability to perceive emotion in others.
"This is an elegant approach to using neuroimaging to better understand [autism]," Andrew Adesman of the Steven and Alexandra Cohen Children's Medical Center of New York, who is not associated with this study, said in a news release. "The natural next step is to try to replicate these findings in further studies, and to expand the research to include younger kids."
It's still unclear which came first -- the weaker brain connections or the lack of use of those connections due to some other neurological deficiency. Either way, these weak links suggest not only difficulty processing emotion in others' voices, but perhaps difficulty getting any pleasure out of voices at all...

Comment