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TWO-LEGGED DOG INSPIRES MILITARY AMPUTEES

 

Faith is a dog who was born with no front legs but has learned to walk on her hind legs. Her tail is in constant wag-motion, indicating her love of life and of all she encounters. And now, she has become a regular on military bases and in military hospitals where soldiers, who have become amputees while deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan, see her as a real inspiration for themselves:
Read more at The Veterans Site
(http://theveteranssite.greatergood.com/clickToGive/vet/article/Two-Legged-Dog-Inspires-Military-Amputees720#utRpIkDUKyxEt5Hm.03)

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Surgeons Practice On Brains Made On 3D Printers


By Michael Dhar, Contributing writer
Published: 11/20/2013 10:08 AM EST on LiveScience
How much practice would you want your brain surgeon to have? Probably a lot -- and the more specific that practice is to your particular brain, the better.
Now, by combining models of brains made on 3D printers and images of simulated surgery, faculty at the University of Florida (UF) are making sure their surgeons get just this kind of training.
Researchers at the university have developed a unique "mixed reality" surgery simulator that gives doctors-in-training a chance to perform real surgery techniques on 3D-printed models derived from actual patients' brains and skulls. Researchers create the models by feeding MRI and CT scans taken from previous patients into 3D printers. Simulated skin covers the printed skulls.
Read the full article at Huffingtonpost 
(http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/11/20/surgeons-brains-3d-printers-practice_n_4309621.html?ncid=edlinkusaolp00000003)

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What can the disabled workforce bring to your company?



Can a proper understanding of "sustainability" still be limited to environmental issues or the so-called "green economy"? Increasingly, many would argue not.

Sustainability now incorporates social dimensions such as social inclusion, equal opportunities and anti-discrimination. They are fundamentally linked, and future sustainability efforts must consider them.
Despite the difficult economic climate, it's good to know the Europe 2020 future growth strategy, developed by EU membersa, reflects this perspective.
EU2020 is focused on "smart, sustainable and inclusive growth", that is interlinked. Furthermore, the European Commission recently launched a new, three-year strategy for CSR which stresses that, to fully meet their objectives in this area, enterprises should integrate social, environmental, ethical, human rights and consumer concerns into their business operations.
Read more at the Guardian 
(http://www.theguardian.com/sustainable-business/disabled-workers-european-disability-strategy)

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Chemicals in Heart Stress Tests Can Actually Trigger Heart Attacks

December 04, 2013

By Dr. Mercola
Cardiac stress tests are sometimes used to make sure your heart works properly when put under stress.
Typically, you’ll be asked to walk on a treadmill or ride a stationary bicycle to increase your heart rate until your heart is adequately stressed, then its function will be examined using an MRI or other imaging tests.
In cases where a person is unable to increase their heart rate via exercise, chemicals are sometimes used to simulate stress on your heart.
You need to be very careful when considering this type of heart test, known as a chemical cardiac stress test, as a new announcement from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) warns that the drugs used could actually trigger a heart attack and death.
Read the full article at Mercola

(http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2013/12/04/chemical-stress-test.aspx?e_cid=20131204Z1A_DNL_art_2&utm_source=dnl&utm_medium=email&utm_content=art2&utm_campaign=20131204Z1A&et_cid=DM34427&et_rid=357451274)

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Timothy Archibald talks Photography and Autism Awareness


Timothy Archibald has received acclaim in the news for taking photos of his son Eli who has autism. The “ECHOLILIA Series” as Timothy calls it was started when his son was 5 and lasted untill he was 8. You can see more photos from his series here.

Can you tell us more on how the Echolilia Series started and what you hoped to gain from it?
Well, like most things, it just began as a reaction. My son was five, had just started Kindergarten, and suddenly every moment and every topic in the house revolved around Eli. The school wants to know why is he acting a certain way? The parents have questions about Eli…Eli this, Eli that….everyone was suddenly trying to address this unusual behavior or simply this bit of unusual something that inhabited Eli. My wife and I didn’t really know anything was up…we just knew he always was a challenge. But after our second son grew older and we started to see what a non autistic child was like…we started to get an idea that things were different with Eli. In an attempt to gain some control over this situation, I begain photographing him during times we were together and alone. 
Like most kids, you can’t really make Eli do something if he doesn’t want to. So he wasn’t very interested in being in the photo alone. But if he could collaborate, if he could suggest the pose, the idea the structure, then he was very much into it. That began our process.
Read the full article at Autism Speaks 
(http://www.autismspeaks.org/news/news-item/timothy-archibald-talks-photography-and-autism-awareness)

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Why Are Glasses Perceived Differently Than Hearing Aids?


All bodies are getting assistance from technology all the time, yet some are stigmatized.Abler is one woman's quest to rectify this.

Without technology, the human body is a pretty limited instrument. We cannot write without a pen or pencil, nor eat hot soup without a bowl and, perhaps, a spoon.

And yet, only certain technologies are labeled "assistive technologies": hearing aids, prostheses, wheelchairs. But surely our pens and pencils, bowls and spoons assist us as well. The human body is not very able all on its own. 

My curiosity about how we think about these camps of "normal" and "assistive" technologies brought me to Sara Hendren, a leading thinker and writer on adaptive technologies and prosthetics. Her wonderful site, Abler, was recently syndicated by Gizmodo. I talked to her about why crutches don't look cool, where the idea of "normal" comes from, and whether the 21st century might bring greater understanding of human diversity.

Read the full article at the Atlantic 

(http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2013/12/why-are-glasses-perceived-differently-than-hearing-aids/282005/)

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A new golden age for cane design?

SARA HENDREN on ABLER Monday 11:22am

Auction houses will still sell you exquisite canes from the late 19th and early 20th century. They often feature ornate carved wood or engraved silver, with all manner of designs and images on their handles. For those who aren't antiques enthusiasts, however, canes have been bereft of much contemporary design imagination. Until recently, that is. An Indie-gogo funded design team, Top and Derby, have created their new "sneaker-styled" Chatfield walking cane:
A new golden age for cane design?SEXPAND
It comes in four sizes to ideally match multiple heights.
Read more at Abler. Gizmodo
(http://abler.gizmodo.com/a-new-golden-age-for-cane-design-1474883656)

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First use of retrograde gene therapy on a human heart


Procedure delivers stem cells to the heart to repair damaged muscle and arteries
December 2, 2013

A new procedure designed to deliver stem cells to the heart to repair damaged muscle and arteries in the most minimally invasive way possible has been performed for the first time by Amit Patel, M.D., director of Clinical Regenerative Medicine and Tissue Engineering and an associate professor in the Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery at the University of Utah School of Medicine.
Patel started investigating cell and gene-based therapies for the treatment of heart disease 12 years ago, but only recently received FDA approval to try the therapy on Lively, who was the first of several patients anxious to receive the treatment.
More than 6 million people are currently living with heart failure. As the condition progresses, patients’ options are usually limited to a heart transplant or assist devices, such as an artificial heart. Patel wanted to find a way to intervene in the progression of heart failure before a patient advanced to the point of needing a heart transplant or device.
Read the full article at Kurzweilai
(http://www.kurzweilai.net/first-use-of-retrograde-gene-therapy-on-a-human-heart)

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Has An Identity Crisis Immobilized The Field of Sign Language Interpreting?


 | December 3, 2013
During my attendance at the 2012 Region IV RID Conference in Denver and the 2013 National RID Conference in Indianapolis I found myself in tears more than once. While it is not uncommon for me to become emotional when I am with colleagues discussing the very serious, real and important issues that impact our work as interpreters, the tears I felt at these conferences were different. It was not until a moment of clarity during the business meeting in Indianapolis that I realized the difference.
It was not long after the start of the Business meeting in Indianapolis when I experienced a shift in my awareness about my emotional response during both conferences. It occurred as I was witnessing discussion and decisions regarding the use of spoken English via open microphone. As I was sitting there, feeling helpless, looking around the room feeling the heavy and volatile energy – I realized I felt as if I was witnessing a war. A battle waged between two perspectives, the deaf and hearing world, both fighting for recognition.
As a person who has grown up in both worlds, I have struggled with my own identity and place in each world since I can remember. Sitting there, I found myself relating with perspectives from both “sides.” As I type this, it strikes me that it may not seem such a powerful realization. After all, this struggle between the two worlds has been going on for years.
By framing this struggle through the lens of war and making the connection between my internal struggle and the mirror reflecting around me I found clarity that I have not yet experienced.
Read the full article at Street Leverage 
(http://www.streetleverage.com/2013/12/has-an-identity-crisis-immobilized-the-field-of-sign-language-interpreting/)

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The Future of People with Severe Mental Illnesses is in the Wrong Hands


By Susan Inman, Posted: 12/03/2013 5:41 pm
Planning for the future presents serious problems for parents of people with significant disabilities; when those families are dealing with psychotic illnesses, the future is especially frightening.
Organizations have become skillful at lobbying for humane supports for people with most disabilities. However, for people impacted by the most severe mental illnesses, the future is in the wrong hands.
To understand the problem, look at the taxpayer-funded Alternatives conference being held this week in Austin, Texas. Anyone assuming that this large, annual mental health event is designed to help people with the most severe mental illnesses just needs to study the program carefully.
While its theme promotes "Valuing Every Voice," try to locate what the conference offers for people with psychotic disorders. Actually, you won't find the words "psychosis," "bipolar disorder," "schizophrenia," or even "mental illnesses" in the program, since this kind of labeling is considered to be the problem.
Read the full article at Huffigntonpost 
(http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/susan-inman/the-future-of-mental-illness_b_4377732.html)

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WebMD Pockets Millions to Stimulate $1 Trillion in Drug Sales


December 04, 2013 
By Dr. Mercola
According to the Washington Times,1 WebMD, the second most visited health site on the World Wide Web, has received a $4.8 million government contract to educate doctors about the ins and outs of the Affordable Care Act, colloquially dubbed “Obamacare.”
A similar contract for the public portal to educate consumers might also be in the works. However, the lack of transparency and disclosure of the contract has raised questions about potential conflicts of interest.
WebMD has defended against such allegations, saying that the government contract does not affect the company’s news operation, which is free to report what it wants about the health care plan. Still, as stated in the featured article:
“[F]ew if any news outlets earn millions of dollars in training fees from the government on topics they cover, putting WebMD in a unique spot in the media landscape as it navigates not only potential conflicts but also the appearance of conflicts.”

Read more at Mercola

(http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2013/12/04/webmd-obamacare.aspx?e_cid=20131204Z1A_DNL_art_1&utm_source=dnl&utm_medium=email&utm_content=art1&utm_campaign=20131204Z1A&et_cid=DM34427&et_rid=357451274)

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Study Finds Low Zinc Levels Associated With Depression

A meta-analysis of studies measuring blood concentrations of zinc in some 1,600 depressed subjects and 800 control subjects has found that zinc concentrations were significantly lower in the patients with depression. And in the studies that measured depressive symptoms, greater depression severity was associated with a greater relative zinc deficiency. The senior researcher was Krista Lanctot, Ph.D., of the University of Toronto, and results are published in Biological Psychiatry.

Read the full article at Psychiatric News

(http://alert.psychiatricnews.org/2013/12/study-finds-low-zinc-levels-associated.html)

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Pinkwash? For Every $100 Of NFL Pink Merchandise Sales, Only $3.54 Goes Toward Cancer Research


by Rick Chandler | 8:45 pm, October 9th, 2013
The NFL, meanwhile, keeps $45: making it a huge moneymaker for a league that already enjoys nonprofit tax-exempt status. (The league says that it doesn’t actually profit from this, however. See below). So should the NFL get flagged for “pinkwashing”: exploiting a good cause for its own benefit? With its Breast Cancer Awareness “Crucial Catch Campaign” Month, is the league more interested in promoting its brand — especially among women — than it is in actually helping a good cause?
According to Business Insider, the NFL is keeping approximately 90 percent of money from sales of Breast Cancer Awareness gear, like that towel above. And of the money that the American Cancer Society does receive, less than 80 percent of that goes toward actual research.
When we contacted the NFL’s online shop for clarification, we were told 5% of the sales are being donated to the American Cancer Society. If the pink products have a typical 100% mark-up at retail, that means the NFL is keeping 90% of the profit from the sale of Breast Cancer Awareness gear.
And then consider that only 70.8% of money the ACS receives goes towards research and cancer programs. So, for every $100 in sales of pink gear, only $3.54 is going towards research while the NFL is keeping approximately $45 (based on 100% mark-up).

Read more at Sports Grid

(http://www.sportsgrid.com/nfl/pinkwash-for-every-100-of-nfl-pink-merchandise-sales-only-3-54-goes-toward-cancer-research/) 

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Doctor Paralyzed from the Waist Down is Still Able to Perform Surgeries



Nov 28, 2013 12:32 PM EST By Camille H

Doctor Paralyzed from the Waist Down is Still Able to Do Surgeries
(Photo: Army Medicine/Flickr) Doctor Paralyzed from the Waist Down is Still Able to Do Surgeries
An orthopedic surgeon who was paralyzed from the waist down still performs surgeries through the use of a stand-up wheelchair, according to the Daily Mail.
Dr. Ted Rummel, an orthopedic surgeon from O'Fallon, Missouri suddenly became paralyzed in 2010 after a blood-filled cyst burst in his spine.
After a year of rehabilitation, he went back to work and started operating on his patients using a traditional wheelchair.
Dr. Rummel told the Enquirer that his freedom has been a lifesaver. "When I'm able to do this, and I can get a piece of my life back, it's huge. It's so special," he said.
Read the full article at Parent Herald 
(http://www.parentherald.com/articles/3092/20131128/doctor-paralyzed-waist-down-still-surgeries.htm)

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Creativity is similar to insanity


on 



Creativity and insanity are not that different according to scientists. 
After many years of studying human's mind, scientists from Karolinska Institute in Sweden found that the though pathways of creative people are quite similar to those of people with schizophrenia. Both lack some important receptors used to direct and filter thoughts. It could be this uninhibited processing that allows creative people to “think outside the box”. That could lead to mental illness in some people. But rather than a clear division, experts suspect a continuum, with some people having psychotic traits but few negative symptoms...

Read more at End Riot

(http://endoriot.blogspot.com/2013/11/creativity-is-similar-to-insanity.html)

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10 Things The Media Should Stop Doing When Discussing Disabilities

Posted on:  

The media loves to think they know everything. They love being in on the latest “it” thing, acting like they’re hip and can relate to the people. However, they never seem to care about stepping it up when it comes to referring to people with disabilities in the most appropriate way.
The written and spoken word is constantly evolving too. The media knows when to use “twerk” and “tweet,” but would it kill them to stop saying “wheelchair-bound?”
If the way the media discusses disabilities makes you cringe, read on for the top ten things the media should stop doing when discussing disabilities.
1) Stop saying “wheelchair-bound.”
A term nearly as old as the wheelchair itself, the term “wheelchair-bound” needs to be left in the antique store with its wooden wheelchair-counterpart. Seriously, who says this anymore? Saying “Tiffiny is wheelchair-bound” is absolutely the wrong way to refer to someone who uses a wheelchair, yet the media does it all the time.
We are not bound by our wheelchairs. How can we be “bound” by something that makes us so independent? If anything, it should be more like “the chair is human-bounded” rather than the “person is wheelchair-bound.” We overtake the wheelchair and make it our own. I even think some of us would even put nano-technology into our bodies if it was possible. What should they say instead? Look for the answer below.
Read the full article at the Mobility Resource 
(http://www.themobilityresource.com/10-things-mainstream-media-should-stop-doing-when-discussing-disabilities/)

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10 THINGS YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT PEOPLE WHO HAVE AUTISM


1. NEVER under-estimate an individual because they are on the spectrum. Some of the most intelligent, interesting, and most capable people I know have Autism. 
2. Don’t assume that people with autism are emotionless or uncaring if they don’t respond in a way you would expect others to respond. Often times people on the spectrum have a harder time displaying and sorting their feelings and emotions. Sometimes they see things so black and white that they may not see your side.
View the full list at Rockin Moms World 
(http://rockinmomsworld.com/2013/11/05/10-things-you-need-to-know-about-people-who-have-autism/)

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'The Most Dramatic Advance in Treating Depression in Decades'


Focusing on getting quality sleep, specifically through cognitive behavioral therapy, is the talk of the moment in depression treatment.



"Psychiatrists have long thought that depression causes insomnia," wrote the New York Timeseditorial board this weekend, "but new research suggests that insomnia can actually precede and contribute to causing depression."

Small studies have shown that cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) can be of serious benefit to people with depression. "If the results [of this research] hold up in other studies already underway at major medical centers," they write, "this could be the most dramatic advance in treating depression in decades."

That really is a substantial assertion...

Read the full article at The Atlantic 

(http://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2013/11/the-most-dramatic-advance-in-treating-depression-in-decades/281839/)

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Sandy Hook spurs states' mental health push


In the anguished days following the mass shootings at Sandy Hook Elementary School, President Barack Obama called for a renewed national focus on mental health.
His plea went nowhere in Congress. But states from South Carolina to Oregon have taken up the challenge.
At least 37 states have increased spending on mental health in the year since Adam Lanza shot dead 20 children, six school employees and his mother in Newtown, Conn. It’s not just about money, either. States are experimenting with new — and sometimes controversial — ways to raise awareness about psychological distress, to make treatment more accessible for children and adults and to keep firearms away from those struggling with mental illness.

Nevada, for instance, is launching a pilot program to screen children in secondary schools for mental health concerns. Texas not only boosted mental health funding by a record $300 million over two years, but required public school teachers and students to be trained in recognizing mental illness. Utah will require school districts to offer parents an annual seminar on mental health, including depression and suicide. Colorado established a 24-hour crisis hotline...

Read the full article at Politico 


(http://www.politico.com/story/2013/12/sandy-hook-mental-health-spending-100453.html)

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MORE AND MORE US VETERANS ARE SMOKING WEED TO TREAT THEIR PTSD


By Thor Benson

In America, the relationship between doctors and the hegemonic pharmaceutical industry is fraught with painful, mind-numbing contradiction. There’s no better example of this than in the treatment of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) among US veterans and others around the country. Drugs like Risperdal, an antipsychotic, are said to be no more effective in the treatment of PTSD than a placebo. These drugs are widely distributed to treat the symptoms of PTSD, despite allegations that they’re ineffectual in treatment of the condition.
PTSD is a disorder, characterized by extreme emotional or mental anxiety, often the result of a physical or psychological injury. When confronted with a potentially deadly situation, it’s natural for humans to feel afraid—we’ve developed pretty sophisticated fight-or-flight responses to deal with real or perceived danger. PTSD arises when that response is damaged, and the patient feels stressed or frightened even when he or she is no longer in danger. The disease disproportionately affects soldiers deployed in war zones. Very often they are in situations so dangerous that they develop the condition, and return home as shell-shocked emotional cripples. Veteran’s Affairs claims that today, almost 300,000 veterans have been diagnosed with PTSD, although the number is likely much higher due to lack of diagnosis...
Read the full article at VICE
(http://www.vice.com/read/more-and-more-us-veterans-are-smoking-weed-to-treat-their-ptsd?utm_source=vicetwitterus)

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